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(Never mind, Cunningham will never understand. Yet he keeps crossposting his confusion to sci.lang.)

Not that I care what the muddleheaded Peter T Daniels thinks of anything I say, but I would like to comment for the benefit of readers who may mistakenly believe what he has said.
He has demonstrated an inability or a disinclination to understand what he's reading before he responds. He typically remembers my saying things I haven't said.

He once agreed completely with some remarks I made about using square brackets versus slashes, but went on to say that that wasn't what I had said in the past. I have never changed what I have had to say on that subject since long before I first mentioned it in sci.lang.
One example of his foolishness was when he thought he had found dozens of questions in a posting of mine in which I had asked only one or two.
(Never mind, Cunningham will never understand. Yet he keeps crossposting his confusion to sci.lang.)

Not that I care what the muddleheaded Peter T Daniels thinks of anything I say, but I would like to ... never changed what I have had to say on that subject since long before I first mentioned it in sci.lang.

Perhaps Mr. Cunningham got it right once in the past, but the message he sent to sci.lang yesterday continued to reveal the confusion he usually displayed.
One example of his foolishness was when he thought he had found dozens of questions in a posting of mine in which I had asked only one or two.

Mr. Cunningham likes to harp on the fact that he was unfamiliar with the phenomenon of "indirect question."

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
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Perhaps Mr. Cunningham got it right once in the past, but the message he sent to sci.lang yesterday continued to reveal the confusion he usually displayed.

Daniels likes to hint at error without being specific. That way he's harder to pin down. So far as I know I said nothing yesterday that was any different from what I've always said about square brackets versus slashes, and I continue to believe that what I said was correct.
If Daniels were a respectable sort of person, he would be specific about what he thought was wrong with what I said. But he doesn't seem to be, so he probably won't. I would expect to find that anything he claims was wrong with what I said can be supported by references to the literature.

Daniels should put up or shut up. Of the two I would prefer the latter, so long as it was permanent.
One example of his foolishness was when he thought he ... mine in which I had asked only one or two.

Mr. Cunningham likes to harp on the fact that he was unfamiliar with the phenomenon of "indirect question."

Daniels still fails to understand that he fantasized indirect questions where there were no indirect questions.
Stewart:
do many of you across the pond have the same vowel in 'father', 'aunt' etc. as in 'dog', 'box', etc.?

Everything you've written is true: the "Short O" sound is the "ahhh" sound, as in "father" and "box". "Dog" does not take the short O; it's got the "aw" vowel sound. "Aunt" also does not have the "ahhh" sound. It sounds exactly the same as "ant". A as in "Mary".
Perhaps Mr. Cunningham got it right once in the past, ... sci.lang yesterday continued to reveal the confusion he usually displayed.

Daniels likes to hint at error without being specific. That way he's harder to pin down. So far as I ... should put up or shut up. Of the two I would prefer the latter, so long as it was permanent.

I got tired of explaining it to him. If he didn't get it the first dozen times, I doubt he'll get it the thirteenth.
Mr. Cunningham likes to harp on the fact that he was unfamiliar with the phenomenon of "indirect question."

Daniels still fails to understand that he fantasized indirect questions where there were no indirect questions.

I don't know why he thinks anyone cares, but if anyone do, they can find the message for themself. It was many years ago.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Chicago "cot" is like a shorter version of Non-rhotic Boston or Common Australian "cart".

To my ear, traditional Bostonian "cart" is the same pronunciation as my "cat". In 1942, shortly after I arrived at ... something. Turned out the man's name was "Carter" and the man who told me to see him was a Bostonian.

One summer I had a job in Boston, and one of my co-workers was named "Mark", only before I knew that I heard him answer the phone saying "This is Mack Millah".

Steny '08!
Indeed there are. But it is also found throughout the ... the ring of suburbs surrounding Detroit rather than Detroit Proper).

These discussions always puzzle me. I lived in Chicago for a number of years, and I just can't imagine how ... likely to bring the cot detail into the discussion. So..how did you do your research on the pronunciation of "cot"?

Of course it's not "cot" specifically, Coop. "Cot" is just a convenient way of saying "words with the 'cot' vowel", that is, a large class of words with traditional short o. I think the reason why we talk about "cot" so much is that it can be contrasted with "caught". "Don" and "dawn" work too, but apparently some people are CINC only before nasals, or maybe it's not before nasals...I forget.
You say the usage extends through the entire Upper Midwest and Inland North.

Yes. I was amazed when I found that Western Connecticut people really sound a lot like Michiganders or Chicagoans.
Perhaps this is why you didn't like Chicago pizza. You'd order a pie and ask the server if you could ... cot in the back". Hell, they probably served you raw pizza just to get you out of the joint quickly.

Coop, if I had tried to order a "pie" they would have (= TCE "of") stared at me blankly.
You might have enjoyed Chicago more had you decided to research the pronunciation of "beer" or "Vienna All-Beef" or "alewife" or even "thuringer".

I remember thuringer being popular in Michigan during my temporary stay there.
If you've got a thing for three letter words, how about "Sox"? I'm sure there are "Socks" people and "Sacks" people.

True. Chicago's baseball teams are the "Sax" and the "Cups".

Steny '08!
So..how did you do your research on the pronunciation of "cot"?

Yes. I was amazed when I found that Western Connecticut people really sound a lot like Michiganders or Chicagoans.

You are amazed that people in Connecticut speak the same language as people from Michigan? You had some earlier doubts that Fran and Maria would be able to communicate with each other without pointing and grunting?
Perhaps this is why you didn't like Chicago pizza. You'd ... pizza just to get you out of the joint quickly.

Coop, if I had tried to order a "pie" they would have (= TCE "of") stared at me blankly.

Why? I lived in Chicago and used the word in my post. You think Chicagoans don't watch "The Sopranos"? "Pie", as a term for pizza, is well-known down here in the backwater south.
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(Email Removed) wrote in
, , etc. can be very close to Hungarian .
Brian
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