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"Slices of pie", when speaking of pizza, is unidiomatic in New York English (including Queens English). You say "slices of pizza".

But you agree that Queens is a suburb of New York?

That's over-egging the cake. You have to slip it in and not wave it in his face.
Maybe he was from Chicago. We have been told that there are Chicagoans who pronounce "cot" (kA:t) like other people's "cat" (k&t).

In England there's a place called Cotswold, where a lot of cozies are set. I imagine it to be a place where cats (cots) roam a forest (wold).
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Maybe he was from Chicago. We have been told that there are Chicagoans who pronounce "cot" (kA:t) like other people's "cat" (k&t).

In England there's a place called Cotswold, where a lot of cozies are set. I imagine it to be a place where cats (cots) roam a forest (wold).

Is there a place called "Cotswold"? There is an area called "the Cotswolds". Not much in the way of forest there, although there is a wooded area next to my inlaws' house. I'll look out for cats next time I visit.
Fran
ObTony: (on the lack of "cot" in conversation) Haven't they had Epcot there in Orlando the whole time you've been there? You don't get Chicagoans asking where it is?

Chicago "Epcot" should sound a bit like Cockney "hep cat".

Steny '08!
"Slices of pie", when speaking of pizza, is unidiomatic in New York English (including Queens English). You say "slices of pizza".

But you agree that Queens is a suburb of New York?[/nq]No, I cannot agree with this, though I didn't take Coop's bait. I'm comfortable with calling Douglaston or Little Neck suburbs, for various reasons. There are communities to the east of St. Albans, further to the south (in the old town of Jamaica) which are also probably suburbs, but I never really mastered southern Queens geography. I only have a hazy idea of where St. Albans is, for example, though I know that Albert Roker, Jr., the greatest meteorological broadcaster in American if not human history, is from there.

I've been to Laurelton, and maybe even Rosedale, of which Eric Clapton (Popularizer of the Post-1966 British Beard) once sang. Those places aren't suburbs. Aren't the Turturro Siblings from Rosedale? How 'bout Jamaica Estates? A school classmate was from there, which suggests that it wasn't a suburb. But now that I think of it, I had a high school classmate who I believe was from Little Neck, which means Little Neck is not a suburb, so you can ignore everything I just wrote.

I saw a reference somewhere I think it may have been in the New York Times! the day after Election Day, to "the Queens section of New York". Oy! Queens is not a "section"; it contains several "sections".

Steny '08!
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I saw a reference somewhere I think it may have been in the New York Times! the day after Election Day, to "the Queens section of New York". Oy! Queens is not a "section"; it contains several "sections".

I agree that Queens is not a section. "Section" is code for "bad neighborhood."

SML
Dignity, always dignity.
Chicago "cot" is like a shorter version of Non-rhotic Boston or Common Australian "cart".

To my ear, traditional Bostonian "cart" is the same pronunciation as my "cat".

Cat and cart sound very different to this lifelong Bostonian. In Bostonian AR is stretched out to AHH, if no R is after the A then the A is not broadened
I saw a reference somewhere I think it may ... Oy! Queens is not a "section"; it contains several "sections".

I agree that Queens is not a section. "Section" is code for "bad neighborhood."

Could be. I've argued (based on some evidence) that "section" is the Queens equivalent of Brooklyn "neighborhood" (suggesting that Queens has no neighborhoods it only has sections, or else that those sections are so big that they themselves contain neighborhoods). However, I am a native Brooklyn (FLCIA) speaker, SWDIK?

Steny '08!
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I do notice on "The Sopranos" that they fold slices before they cram
them in their mouths. That seems a bit "Tom Jones" to me

Folding pizza is SOP in New York City and environs. I don't understand the "Tom Jones" reference.I don't recall there being pizza in the book or the Albert Finney movie and I've never seen the singer eat a pizza.
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