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The protagonist recalls his childhood.
He spent a day with the friends of his mother's acquaintance Mr. Murdstone and himself.

When he was gone, my mother asked me all about the day I had had, and what they had said and done.
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Can I say of her faceㅡaltered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it isㅡthat it is gone, when here it comes before me at this instant, as distant as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street? Can I say of her innocent and girlish beauty, that it faded and was no more, when its breath falls on my cheek now, as it fell that night? Can I say she ever changed, when my remembrance brings her back to life, thus only, and, truer its loving youth than I have been, or man ever is, still holds fast what it cherished then?
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know if "altered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it is" means "though I have reason to remember it altered, know it is perished."
I'd like to know if "as" is used in similar usage to one as in "The news came as a shock."
And I'd like to know if "only, and, truer its loving youth" is the subject of "holds."
Thank you in advance for your help.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thank you, teechr, for your continuing support. Emotion: yes