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The protagonist recalls his childhood.
He spent a day with the friends of his mother's acquaintance Mr. Murdstone and himself.

When he was gone, my mother asked me all about the day I had had, and what they had said and done.
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Can I say of her faceㅡaltered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it isㅡthat it is gone, when here it comes before me at this instant, as distant as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street? Can I say of her innocent and girlish beauty, that it faded and was no more, when its breath falls on my cheek now, as it fell that night? Can I say she ever changed, when my remembrance brings her back to life, thus only, and, truer its loving youth than I have been, or man ever is, still holds fast what it cherished then?
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know if "altered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it is" means "though I have reason to remember it altered, know it is perished."
I'd like to know if "as" is used in similar usage to one as in "The news came as a shock."
And I'd like to know if "only, and, truer its loving youth" is the subject of "holds."
Thank you in advance for your help.
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park sang joonI'd like to know if "altered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it is" means "though I have reason to remember it altered, know it is perished."
It means "which has (been) changed and now looks different from the image of her face that I remember, and which doesn't exist (look) anymore as it used to.
park sang joonI'd like to know if "as" is used in similar usage to one as in "The news came as a shock."
The "as something as" is a commonly used comparative structure in English. Have a look at the link below.
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/as-as
park sang joonAnd I'd like to know if "only, and, truer its loving youth" is the subject of "holds."
That's right.
Thank you, teechr, for your so very kind answer.Emotion: smile

Can I say of her faceㅡaltered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it isㅡthat it is gone, when here it comes before me at this instant, as distinct as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street? Can I say of her innocent and girlish beauty, that it faded and was no more, when its breath falls on my cheek now, as it fell that night? Can I say she ever changed, when my remembrance brings her back to life, thus only, and, truer its loving youth than I have been, or man ever is, still holds fast what it cherished then?

Then I was wondering what "as" means here.
I thought "as" means either "because" or "though."

Then I was wondering "distinct" modifies "gone."
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park sang joonThen I was wondering what "as" means here.
I read the first one to mean "like" and the second "because."
park sang joonThen I was wondering "distinct" modifies "gone."
No, it modifies "face."
Thank you, teechr, for your continuing support. Emotion: smile
I'm so sorry if I am badgering you, but I have a difficult time in understanding the usages of "as" and ones of the long dash.

Then I was wondering if "altered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it is" means "It has altered as I have reason to remember it, it has perished because I know it is so."

Then I was wondering if "it is gone, as distinct as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street." means "it is gone, as distinct (face) as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street," and "(face)" is in apposition to "it."
park sang joonThen I was wondering if "altered as I have reason to remember it, perished as I know it is" means "It has altered as I have reason to remember it, it has perished because I know it is so."
Yes, that's how I see it.
park sang joonThen I was wondering if "it is gone, as distinct as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street." means "it is gone, as distinct (face) as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street," and "(face)" is in apposition to "it."
Look at the original without the extra (parenthetical) information between the dashes.

Can I say of her face that it is gone, when here it comes before me at this instant, as distinct as any face that I may choose to look on in a crowded street?
Then simplify that sentence a bit more.

Can I say of her face that it is gone, when here it comes before me, as distinct as any face in a crowded street?
Does it make sense now?
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By the way, you wrote "distant" instead of the original "distinct" in your initial post. Emotion: wink
Thank you, teechr, for your continuing to answer. Emotion: smile

By the way, you wrote "distant" instead of the original "distinct" in your initial post.
I'm so sorry; "distant" is a mistyping.

Can I say of her face that it is gone, when here it comes before me, as distinct as any face in a crowded street?
I can't figure out how "as distinct" can modifies "any face." Emotion: crying
park sang joonI can't figure out how "as distinct as" can modifies "any face."
Think of "as distinct as" as meaning "clearly like" or just "like."

Can I say of her face that it is gone, when here it comes before me, clearly like any face in a crowded street?
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