+0
The following is about Pandora.

From her is the race of women and female kind: of her is the deadly race and tribe of women who live amongst mortal men to their great trouble, no helpmate in hateful poverty, but only in wealth.
[Source: The Poet Hesiod, Prometheus and Pandora http://www.fsmitha.com/h1/rel-greece2.htm ]

I think "from her" and "of her" is fronted, "is of her" means "is her attribute," and that "no helpmate in hateful poverty, but only in wealth" is a participle phrase.
And I'd like to know if my thought is right.
Thank you in advance for your help.
Comments  
Yes, the prepositional phrases are fronted. Ordinarily, we would say "The race of women is [descended] from her." The normal word order puts the prepositional phrase after the verb ("is"), which comes after the subject ("race"). In this version the prepositional phrase comes first to emphasize "her." Note that as often happens in fronting, the order of subject and verb is reversed.

There is no verbal construct in "no helpmate in hateful poverty, but only in wealth," so it can't be a participial phrase. It's a noun phrase with "helpmate" modified by a compound prepositional phrase ("in ... poverty but ... in wealth). The phrase is an appositive to "race and tribe."
Thank you, deadrat, for your yet another kind answer.
But, I don't yet know the meaning of "is of her."

Note that as often happens in fronting, the order of subject and verb is reversed.
I was wondering what the subject of "happens" is.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
park sang joonBut, I don't yet know the meaning of "is of her."
This is a slightly archaic formulation meaning "belonging to her family as a descendant" or "of her blood [lines]," i.e.,she's an ancestor.
park sang joonI was wondering what the subject of "happens" is.
There's an elided relative pronoun. The grammar can be seen more clearly thus:

Note that the order of the subject and verb is reversed, which often happens in fronting.

Thank you very much for your continuing support. Emotion: smile
But I can't yet understand the usage of "as" caluse you used.
I know "as" can indiciate the former clause in "Note that the order of subject and verb is reversed, as often happens in fronting."
But thus far I haven't not seen "as" indicates the later clause as in "Note that as often happens in fronting, the order of subject and verb is reversed."
Did your parents ever tell you, "As long as you live under my roof, you'll do as I say."? The "as" clause is just an adverbial clause, and it can modify a verb ahead of it as well as behind it.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I'm so sorry but, I'd like to ask you one more thing.

1. He was brave man, as are all of his family.
2. As are all of his family, he was brave man.

I'd like to know if I can rephrase #1 to #2.
Yes. It will depend on whether you want to emphasize his individual bravery (1) or his family members' bravery (2).