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A royal family member of Amber, the protagonist keeps the mother of his best friend Luke in his room after he rescued her from her adversary's den, where he found her petrified by her adversary.
She was an enormous threat against Amber.
The protagonist is now talking to Luke through telepathy and Luke wants to get back his mother.

"But I hardly think it's an insurmountable barrier. Not if she's more useful to you free than as a piece of furniture."
"You've lost me," I said. "What are you proposing?"
"Nothing yet. I'm just sounding you out."
"Fair enough, But offhand, I can't see a situation such as you describe arising. More valuable to use free than a prisoner. . . . I guess we'd go where the value lies. But these are just words."
["Sign of Chaos" of The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny]
I'd like to know if I can put "as" before "arising," and "arising" means "it will arise."
I'd like to know if "arising" is a gerund or a present participle.
I'd like to know if "free than a prisoner" is an abbreviation of "when she is free than a prisoner."
And I'd like to know if "More valuable to use free than a prisoner" is an adverbial phrase.
Thank you in advance for your help.
Comments  
park sang joonI'd like to know if I can put "as" before "arising," and "arising" means "it will arise."
Not really. Arising means "to materialize / appear / show up in the future."
But offhand, I can't see a situation such as you describe arising.
park sang joonI'd like to know if "arising" is a gerund or a present participle.
Participle. It describes "situation."
park sang joonI'd like to know if "free than a prisoner" is an abbreviation
No. An abbreviation is a shortened form of a word ending in a full stop:
Mister (abbreviation: Mr.)
versus (abbreviation: vs.)
Texas (abbreviation: Tx. or TX)
ante meridian (abbreviation: a.m. / am )
park sang joon"More valuable to use free than a prisoner" is an adverbial phrase.
No, it is a sentence fragment. Perhaps a noun phrase interpreting what he means by the "situation."
Thank you, AlpheccaStars, for your so very kind answer.Emotion: smile

No. An abbreviation is a shortened form of a word ending in a full stop
Then I was wondering "free than a prisoner" means "when she is free than a prisoner."

No, it is a sentence fragment. Perhaps a noun phrase interpreting what he means by the "situation."
I think "More valuable to use free than a prisoner" is an adjective phrase, not a noun phrase.
So how about "She might be more valuable to use free than a prisoner."?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
park sang joonSo how about "She might be more valuable to use free than a prisoner."?
She is more valuable to use as a free entity than as an imprisoned entity.
She is more useful when she is free than when she is a prisoner.
park sang joonMore valuable to use free than a prisoner. . . . I guess we'd go where the value lies. But these are just words."
The version I found online says "More valuable to us free than a prisoner".
GPYThe version I found online says "More valuable to us free than a prisoner".
Emotion: rolleyes

Emotion: boxing

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
GPYThe version I found online says "More valuable to us free than a prisoner".
What a difference an "e" makes!
AlpheccaStarsWhat a difference an "e" makes!
Hopefully not enough to determine one's fat in life.

CJ