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Can I say "The poor Countries" or must I say "_Poor Countries"?

Isn't there a rule in Standard British Grammar according to which I put the article because I mean "The poor Countries (as opposed to the rich Countries)"?

Emy ^_^
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Comments  (Page 2) 
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has establishes standards to which the laws in many countries cannot follow do not live up. Children are poor, homeless, abused, neglected, ill, often illiterate and are unequal before the law. This happens in the poor countries. The countries who that ratify have ratified the Convention must have to grant an harmonious development of for all children, their health, education and must have to protect them from exploitation and dangerous work. To do so, the governments must have to find out the funds and conform their system to the standards required by a special Committee.
The parent's role is fundamental to help their children to understand both rights and responsibilities.
Hi, Clive Emotion: smile

I have just written my summary in a format that you can then copy and edit. I hope you will tell me your opinion about it.

Thank you very much,

Emy
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Hi,

OK, but where is it?

Can you just put it right in your post?

Clive
AnonymousThe Convention on the Rights of the Child has establishes standards to which the laws in many countries cannot follow do not live up. Children are poor, homeless, abused, neglected, ill, often illiterate and are unequal before the law. This happens in the poor countries. The countries who that ratify have ratified the Convention must have to grant an harmonious development of for all children, their health, education and must have to protect them from exploitation and dangerous work. To do so, the governments must have to find out the funds and conform their system to the standards required by a special Committee.
The parent's role is fundamental to help their children to understand both rights and responsibilities.

Clive, I guess this anon was her. And it's text you can copy and paste now. Emotion: smile
Thanks, Kooyeen.

The Convention on the Rights of the Child has establishes standards to which the laws in many countries cannot follow do not live up. 'Live up to a standard' or 'achieve a standard' sound fine to me. 'Follow a standard' sounds marginal.

Children are poor, homeless, abused, neglected, ill, often illiterate and are unequal before the law. This happens in the poor countries. The countries who that ratify have ratified the Convention must have to provide for grant a an harmonious peaceful development of for all children, their health, and education, and must have to protect them from exploitation and dangerous work. To do so, the governments must have to find out the funds and conform their system to the standards required by a special Committee.
The parents' role is fundamentally to help their children to understand both (whose?) rights and responsibilities.

As you can see, this is getting a bit messy to review.

I suggest you revise it, and then post your new version for further comments.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi Emotion: smile I tried to amend the text and to collect the basic Standard British grammar rules according to books and teachers. Any comment? Emotion: happy

The Convention on the Rights of the Child establishes standards which the laws in many countries cannot achieve / to which the laws in many countries cannot live up. Children are poor, homeless, abused, neglected, ill, often illiterate and unequal before the law. This happens in poor countries. The countries that have ratified the Convention have to provide for a peaceful development for all_children, their health, education and have to protect them from exploitation and dangerous work. To do so, the governments have to find funds and conform their system to the standards required by a special Committee.
The parents’ role is fundamentally to help their children to understand both their rights and responsibilities.

MUST / MUST NOT (only present tense): the obligation comes from the speaker
HAVE TO: the obligation comes from outside the speaker, from someone else, from the situation
DO NOT HAVE TO = it is not necessary

subject (person): WHO/THAT
subject (animal/thing): WHICH/THAT

object (person):WHOM/THAT
object (animal/thing): WHICH/THAT

.... so, can I always use just THAT to avoid any doubt?

anaphoric, specific reference( “which one?”): THE

cataphoric, generic reference( “what sort of?”):

Count = a, the, -s(for plural)
Mass = _ no article