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hi ,there~ I appreciate your help very much~

“broken cup” no any context here ,just the single “broken up”.

broken cup

It s the cup is/was broken ?

Or the cup have/had been broken?

When I meet tense things, I would watch the tense of the main sentence to decide the Adverbial Clause‘s tense, (and I m not very sure I myself about it .)

But the aspect! The aspect I don’t know how to handle it.

example: Even if (I were invited) invited, I wouldn't go. No any context here ~do I have to imagine aspect for it?



Can I say: Even if (I had been invited) invited, I wouldn't go.

example: All things considered (=since All things have been considered), I think we ought to give the job to George.



No any context here ~do I have to imagine perfect aspect for it?

If there were context that “consider” and “give” happened in the same time .could I say: with all things are considered, I think we ought to give the job to George.

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'Broken cup'. It 's the cup is/was broken ? Or the cup have/had been broken?-- All or any of these, but the point is that it is broken now, just as it is (perhaps) red now and yours now.

But the aspect! The aspect I don't know how to handle it.
example: Even if (I were invited) invited, I wouldn't go.-- I don't know what you mean by 'aspect' here-- do you mean perfect vs imperfect? 'If I were' is potential universal present and future time (no invitation has yet come, but it might, though the odds are against it).

Can I say: Even if (I had been invited) invited, I wouldn't go.-- And here, 'If I had been' is past. No invitation came: a definite past non-event.

'All things considered' -- The clause is non-finite; that is, it refers to no definite time or aspect. It is also a fixed phrase.

No any context here ~do I have to imagine perfect aspect for it?-- No

If there were context that "consider" and "give" happened in the same time .could I say: with all things are considered, I think we ought to give the job to George.-- You can't say that because the grammar is wrong, but generally you can change the sentence if you want, and create finite clauses of many types...but they are not the same as the non-finite clause:

All things have been / were considered, and George gets/got/will get the job.
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The work done, we went home.

So I can t see “The work done “happen first or “we went home” happen first? “Done” is only a past participle adjective here. I just got Just the “The work done have passive connotation from the sentence?

After the work had been done we went home.

So I do get tense and aspect from conjugation “After” and also from had been done? We went home happened second?

All things considered, I think we ought to give the job to George.

still, So I can t see tense and aspect ? just get All things considered have passive connotation from the sentence?

since All things have been considered, I think we ought to give the job to George.

From the conjugation since and also from have been considered , I know All things have been considered happened first ?
The work done, we went home.
So I can t see "The work done "happen first or "we went home" happen first? "Done" is only a past participle adjective here. I just got Just the "The work done have passive connotation from the sentence?-- The semantics tells us what happened when, not the grammar. We just reasonably assume that we went home after the work was finished. Compare: 'The book opened, I ate dinner'-- no real relationship of the two parts.

After the work had been done, we went home.
So I do get tense and aspect from conjugation "After" and also from had been done? -- I still don't know what you think 'aspect' is--- you certainly cannot get it from 'after'.

We went home happened second?-- Yes, now grammatically you can see the order of events: After the book was opened, I ate dinner. But because the sentence uses 'after', there is no call for past perfect. After the work was done we went home.

All things considered, I think we ought to give the job to George.
still, So I can t see tense and aspect ? just get All things considered have passive connotation from the sentence?-- Yes, if that much. As I said, it is a fixed phrase (and a well-known radio show).

since All things have been considered, I think we ought to give the job to George.
From the conjugation since and also from have been considered , I know All things have been considered happened first ? -- Yes, by common sense, but not necessarily by grammar: 'since' also means 'because'.
Ah~ I think I got it now~ Thank you all.

The participle is only an adjective here! It s only means we just reasonably assume it.

He stood there, gun ready. vs. He stood there, gun drawn.

Thank you all. Especially to you Mister Micawber ,[F]Emotion: love I especially liked “The semantics tells us what happened when, not the grammar. We just reasonably assume that we went home after the work was finished. Compare: 'The book opened, I ate dinner'-- no real relationship of the two parts. . “ Very strong teached me . It’s wonderful.

Thank you so much for it.

As the aspect ,I just google it at random.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/internet-grammar/verbs/tense.htm
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Ah~ I think I got it now~ Thank you all.

The participle is only an adjective here! It s only means we just reasonably assume it.



He stood there, gun ready. vs. He stood there, gun drawn.





Thank you all. Especially to you Mister Micawber , I especially liked “The semantics tells us what happened when, not the grammar. We just reasonably assume that we went home after the work was finished. Compare: 'The book opened, I ate dinner'-- no real relationship of the two parts. . “ Very strong teached me . It’s wonderful.





Thank you so much for it.





As the aspect ,I just google it at random.



http://www.ucl.ac.uk/internet-grammar/verbs/tense.htm