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1. The average employee spends 2 hours a day checking e-mail.

2. A typical/The average household disposes one ton of garbage a year.

3. The average household spending increase in the 80s was 10 percent a year compared to 3 percent in recent years.

Are there sentences correct?

In #2, are both choices correct?

Thanks.
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Comments  
New2grammar1. An average employee spends 2 hours a day checking e-mail.

2. A typical/An average household disposes one ton of garbage a year.

3. The average household spending increase in the 80's was 10 percent a year compared to 3 percent in recent years.

Are there sentences correct?

In #2, are both choices correct?

Thanks.

I think that you need an apostrophe after 80.
1. The average employee spends 2 hours a day checking e-mail.

2. A typical/The average household disposes one ton of garbage a year.

3. The average household spending increase in the 80's was 10 percent a year compared to 3 percent in recent years.

Are there sentences correct? Yes

In #2, are both choices correct? Yes
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2. A typical/The average household disposes one ton of garbage a year.
Is "disposes" fine here? Shouldn't it have been "disposes of"?

Thanks.
'Disposes of' is not correct.
Is "disposes" fine here? Shouldn't it have been "disposes of"?

I must admit I thought that at first, but a quick google search came up with plenty of instances of dispose without of.

I would always use to dispose of something.
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Neeraj Jain'Disposes of' is not correct.
Why not?
I am quoting the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary :

dispose of sb/sth phrasal verb
to get rid of someone or something or deal with something so that the matter is finished:
How did they dispose of the body?
It took a mere five minutes for the world champion to dispose of (= defeat) his opponent.

dispose verb FORMAL
dispose sb to/towards sb/sth to make someone feel a particular way towards someone or something:
His rudeness when we first met didn't dispose me very kindly to/towards him.
optilangI must admit I thought that at first, but a quick google search came up with plenty of instances of dispose without of.
I would always use to dispose of something.

I see, thanks. My teachers in the UK used to mark "dispose rubbish, waste, etc." wrong. I'll stick with "to dispose of something." Emotion: smile
I'll stick with "to dispose of something."

I'm with you on that one.
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