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I grew mine years ago because I was fed-up with shaving each morning, especially since convention dictates that if you shave your chin, you should do so with an exactness that runs counter to my natural brain patterns, especially just after getting up.
Maintenance for me is running the clippers over it roughly once a month to reduce it down to a level just distinguishable from stubble. Then 30 days of letting it grow. Then back to 5-10 minutes with the clippers. Hardly labour intensive.

John Dean
Oxford
I found the following article, which suggests that beardedness is not as common among British academics as one might have supposed.

Mr Chips din't have one.

Schoolmasters rarely do. But are you taking one or other of the various cinematic representations of Mr Hilton's work, or have you read the original and found it describes him as clean shaven? One on-line source says the inspiration for Chips was "Hilton based the main character on many real-life sources including his father; his Latin, history and English at Leys, a Mr. Toplis; and a master at Leys called "Chops" for his prodigious whiskers. But the chief inspiration was W.H. Balgarnie, a retired master at Leys."
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/mrchips/ei hilton.html
John Dean
Oxford
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I grew mine years ago because I was fed-up with shaving each morning, especially since convention dictates that if you ... from stubble. Then 30 days of letting it grow. Then back to 5-10 minutes with the clippers. Hardly labour intensive.

Sounds like you have Type 4 (The Robin Cook(1)). I could have sworn that I saw a boink photo of you were you were clean-shaven.

(1)NTBCWTPCUG.

Steny '08!
I grew mine years ago because I was fed-up with ... back to 5-10 minutes with the clippers. Hardly labour intensive.

Sounds like you have Type 4 (The Robin Cook(1)). I could have sworn that I saw a boink photo of you were you were clean-shaven.

Nope. Though if the photo was shortly after the monthly trim you'd have to look hard to see that a gossamer quilt of gold adorned my boyish features.
Mr Cook looks to me like a serial beard trimmer. I bet he spends time every morning clipping and tweezing. But as Ned Sherrin once said of David Mellor during his adulterous scandal "Perhaps he doesn't realise that one day his looks will be gone".

John Dean
Oxford
Mr Chips din't have one.

Schoolmasters rarely do. But are you taking one or other of the various cinematic representations of Mr Hilton's work, or have you read the original and found it describes him as clean shaven?

I've read the book but I don't remember that being an issue. I've seen the film from, I think it was, 1935. He only became the headmaster because he was too old to get sent out to the trenches in WWI. It's interesting that the pronunciation of the letter 'c' in Latin was even being argued about back then.
One on-line source says the inspiration for Chips was "Hilton based the main character on many real-life sources including his ... called "Chops" for his prodigious whiskers. But the chief inspiration was W.H. Balgarnie, a retired master at Leys." http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/mrchips/ei hilton.html

Did they do a current remake of Mr Chips? I thought there was something from the 50s, which I have not yet seen, but didn't know about anything more recent.

Personally, I believe that 9/11 should have taught us the lesson that we can't let these countries simmer endlessly in disillusionment without doing something about it because people become susceptible to delusional ideas and delusional actions. Iraq, in my view, is but the first of many efforts, certainly not all military, to remake the very face of the world as constitutional representative democracy.
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Schoolmasters rarely do. But are you taking one or other ... the original and found it describes him as clean shaven?

I've read the book but I don't remember that being an issue. I've seen the film from, I think it ... thought there was something from the 50s, which I have not yet seen, but didn't know about anything more recent.

The original movie (the incomparable Donat) was 1939. 1969 was Peter O'Toole in a 'musical' version. Not, IMHO, a success. 1984 and 2002 saw TV versions over here.

John Dean
Oxford
John Dean wrote on 06 Jan 2005:
I grew mine years ago because I was fed-up with shaving each morning, especially since convention dictates that if you ... from stubble. Then 30 days of letting it grow. Then back to 5-10 minutes with the clippers. Hardly labour intensive.

My situation exactly. My beard is full-face. Maintenance comes not as regularly as yours, though, but only after my wife and son have nagged me long enough about it.

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I found the following article, which suggests that beardedness is not as common among British academics as one might have supposed.

http://www.pharmj.com/pdf/xmas2004/pj 20041218 academics.pdf

Nevertheless, based on a study conducted by the authors, it is concluded that "for men, a beard is associated with higher status in UK academic careers". Possible reasons are:
Reason 5: The admirable men of the past that are studied today all wore beards (errrm, probably the unadmirable ones did too, but they don't appear as often in the books).
Probably a self perpetuating fashion.
Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
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My situation exactly. My beard is full-face.

You're a werewolf?
R.
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