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Nevertheless, based on a study conducted by the authors, it is concluded that "for men, a beard is associated with higher status in UK academic careers".

When I first grew my beard, in 1965, I was working in an office at Brookhaven National Lab, on outer Long Island, which at that time was still fairly rural. I wondered if it would make people think I was a hippie, but in fact it made them say "You're from the Lab". It improved my chances of being allowed to pay by check.
Joe Fineman joe (Email Removed)
(Snip)And now that I've discovered that my local
barber will do it for no extra charge when I get a haircut, I just mightleave all the beard trimming to him. Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.

Brave man, you are!
Cheers, Sage
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Maintenance for me is running the clippers over it roughly once a month to reduce it down to a level just distinguishable from stubble. Then 30 days of letting it grow. Then back to 5-10 minutes with the clippers. Hardly labour intensive.

Very similar to me. Once I left school and didn't have to shave, I pretty much stopped. Originally it was some degree of fashion choice (along with shoulder-length hair - oh that I should be so lucky now!), but in the end I'm just lazy. Plus I completely fail to see the point. I run clippers aggressively over everything hirsute above the shoulder line once every fortnight or so, then forget about it until things start to look vaguely shaggy again.
Cheers - Ian
Sage wrote on 07 Jan 2005:
(Snip)And now that I've discovered that my local

barber will do it for no extra charge when I get a haircut, I just might

leave all the beard trimming to him. Brave man, you are!

Nah. He did a great job last week. Except for the moustache. And I've been having him cut my hair for the past 8 years, so I know he's good.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
John Dean wrote on 06 Jan 2005:

I find that the intrusion of the ends of my moustache between me and my coffee is the signal.

Yes, when my facial hair gets in the way of what I'm eating or drinking, it has to be trimmed. ... it for no extra charge when I get a haircut, I just might leave all the beard trimming to him.

My barber cuts the hair of every man in this house but she doesn't cut her own. Who was driving the engine?

John Dean
Oxford
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Yes, when my facial hair gets in the way of ... I just might leave all the beard trimming to him.

My barber cuts the hair of every man in this house but she doesn't cut her own. Who was driving the engine?

So she went into the garden to cut a cabbage-leaf to make an apple-pie; and at the same time a great she-bear coming up the street, pops its head into the shop. 'What! no soap?' So he died, and she very imprudently married the barber ...
John Dean wrote on 06 Jan 2005: Yes, when my ... I just might leave all the beard trimming to him.

My barber cuts the hair of every man in this house but she doesn't cut her own. Who was driving the engine?

My Lithuanian grandma of course.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
My barber cuts the hair of every man in this house but she doesn't cut her own. Who was driving the engine?

So she went into the garden to cut a cabbage-leaf to make an apple-pie; and at the same time a ... pops its head into the shop. 'What! no soap?' So he died, and she very imprudently married the barber ...

You mean the Great Panjandrum was driving? That must be what the gunpowder was for.

Katy Jennison
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My barber cuts the hair of every man in this house but she doesn't cut her own. Who was driving the engine?

My Lithuanian grandma of course.

...who is a doctor.

SML
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