I found the following article, which suggests that beardedness is not as common among British academics as one might have supposed.

http://www.pharmj.com/pdf/xmas2004/pj 20041218 academics.pdf

Nevertheless, based on a study conducted by the authors, it is concluded that "for men, a beard is associated with higher status in UK academic careers". Possible reasons are:
* "Bearded men are often considered more attractive than those with no facial hair"
* "Bearded men are also perceived as being more aggressive than non-bearded men.. It is possible that increased aggression facilitates employment and success in promotion"
* "individuals perceive beards to be associated with educated and intelligent men, qualities deemed desirable for male university professors"
* "An alternative explanation for the association of academic status and facial hair is that when men reach the top of the academic career ladder they grow a beard. This may be because they are too busy to shave, or they may need to stroke the beard as an aid to intellectual thought. Or they may (perhaps subconciously) feel peer pressure to grow a beard to appear more professorial."

Steny '08!
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I found the following article, which suggests that beardedness is not as common among British academics as one might have supposed. http://www.pharmj.com/pdf/xmas2004/pj 20041218 academics.pdf

Thank you, Richard! I have been waiting for ages for an opportunity to use the word pogonotrophy!

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I found the following article, which suggests that beardedness is not as common among British academics as one might have supposed.

Which "one"?
http://www.pharmj.com/pdf/xmas2004/pj 20041218 academics.pdf Nevertheless, based on a study conducted by the authors, it is concluded that "for men, a beard ... aid to intellectual thought. Or they may (perhaps subconciously) feel peer pressure to grow a beard to appear more professorial."

Or, more simply, it's just an age thing.

Mike (unshaved since about 1970) Barnes
Cheshire, England
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* "An alternative explanation for the association of academic status and facial hair is that when men reach the top ... aid to intellectual thought. Or they may (perhaps subconciously) feel peer pressure to grow a beard to appear more professorial."

Yet another explanation: Some men who dislike shaving reach a certain point in life when they no longer need to give a hoot whether anyone else thinks they should shave or not; so, they don't.

* "An alternative explanation for the association of academic status ... peer pressure to grow a beard to appear more professorial."

Yet another explanation: Some men who dislike shaving reach a certain point in life when they no longer need to give a hoot whether anyone else thinks they should shave or not; so, they don't.

Sure. I confess that today, as I was shaving, it occurred to me that I'd save a lot of time if I didn't feel personally compelled to shave.

Thing is, the British forms of beard tend to be fairly well-groomed varieties, don't they? Certainly types 1 (Bee Gees), 2 (Career Apex Eric Clapton), 3 (Richard Branson), 4 (Robin Cook (is that a beard or a growth?)), and 5 (David Blunkett), which I think represent some of the more popular styles out there, are beards that must require a certain amount of regular maintenance. I've never really had a beard so I don't know. I'd bet that even the South African variety of beard requires some upkeep.

Steny '08!
* Bearded academics, not being recognized, are promoted by mistake.

* They are favourites with Vice-Chancellors, who feed their pet mice on bits of cheese trapped in beards.
R.
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I found the following article, which suggests that beardedness is not as common among British academics as one might have supposed.

Mr Chips din't have one.

Personally, I believe that 9/11 should have taught us the lesson that we can't let these countries simmer endlessly in disillusionment without doing something about it because people become susceptible to delusional ideas and delusional actions. Iraq, in my view, is but the first of many efforts, certainly not all military, to remake the very face of the world as constitutional representative democracy.
* "An alternative explanation for the association of academic status and facial hair is that when men reach the top ... aid to intellectual thought. Or they may (perhaps subconciously) feel peer pressure to grow a beard to appear more professorial."

Although it can operate at cross-purposes and make them look like Grizzly Adams.

Personally, I believe that 9/11 should have taught us the lesson that we can't let these countries simmer endlessly in disillusionment without doing something about it because people become susceptible to delusional ideas and delusional actions. Iraq, in my view, is but the first of many efforts, certainly not all military, to remake the very face of the world as constitutional representative democracy.
Yet another explanation: Some men who dislike ... else thinks they should shave or not; so, they don't.

Sure. I confess that today, as I was shaving, it occurred to me that I'd save a lot of time if I didn't feel personally compelled to shave.

That was my husband's argument. My son sees his more as a personal statement: it comes and goes according to his outlook on life.
Thing is, the British forms of beard tend to be fairly well-groomed varieties, don't they? Certainly types 1 (Bee Gees), ... had a beard so I don't know. I'd bet that even the South African variety of beard requires some upkeep.

There's also the Harold Shipman and, yes, my observations indicate that they all require maintenance which makes the time-saving argument pretty spurious.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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