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If you take the blame from somebody for banning his or her activity, does it mean that he or she blames you for the ban?

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"take the blame from someone" is an unusual phrasing.

The only situation where I possibly might use this is when I accuse a person of doing something and later realize that he or she did nothing wrong.


Normally, you can


take the blame for (doing) something


take the blame for someone (=when someone else did something wrong but you assume the blame)


but


put/lay the blame on someone (=accuse someone )

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Thank you for the reply.

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This is from The Guardian:

“The mayor’s decision was a blessing for Duda and the government because it allowed the liberal opposition to take the blame from the nationalists for banning their march, whilst avoiding the possibility of a neo-fascist festival being held on the centenary of our independence,” said Michał Szułdrzyński, a columnist with Rzeczpospolita, a centre-right broadsheet.

It apparently means "The nationalists blamed the liberal opposition for banning their march".


To me, the original wording "..allowed the liberal opposition to take the blame from the nationalist…" seems awkward at best.


Perhaps, someone else can offer an opnion on this.