+0
hello.

actually, I watched the dodgeball movie 2 days ago.

that sentences come from that movie, I ask my taiwan friend what those mean, but he didn't know.

if is there anyone who knows what those sentences mean, please let me show the way of knowleadge sea.

and I really appreciate everyone who let this forum help someone who are not native speaker like me.

have a happy new year^^.
+0
Ghkgrk,
Please repost your question, but this time include the whole sentence. That will give yourself a better chance to get an answer from forum experts. If you can include any kind of background context, that's even better.

the blood and sesem/ dear barabra.??

The above two phrases doesn't make any sense to me...of course I didn't watch the movie either.
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Like Danyoo, I have not seen the movie and am a bit confused.

Could the first phrase be "blood and semen"? These are used during forensic investigation of crime to identify the criminal(s), especially in rape cases. Would this make sense in the context?

Could the second be "dear Barbara". The start of a letter to someone called Barbara perhaps?
oh sorry about making you confused.

the whole sentence is this following:

- How is dodgeball gonna get us the $50,000?
- They have a cash prize for the winner.

- How much?
- $50,000.

Guys, we are not gonna get $50,000
for playing dodgeball.

- Why not?
- None of us know how to play dodgeball.

l do. We played it in PE last year.
They showed us this film about it.

- Can you get your hands on that film?
- Sure, l guess.

Can we please try to be serious
here for one second?

You said anything we could do to raise
the money. This is that anything. This is it.

Come on, show of hands.
Who wants to play dodgeball?

Come on.

Come on, Pete.

You guys had me at blood and semen.
Come here.

--------------------

- Do l smell cookies?
- Hey.

Dear Barbara.

l like unicorns.

------------------

when the man in that movie said "dear barabra" is that he saw a lot uniconrs statue in her house.

that's why she said "I like unicorns."

..and I thank you for your answers
I was hoping someone would answer your post. These lines are like an "inside joke" and only the people who know the background can appreciate.

I can only guess that "blood and semen" is just another silly game that they played.

Also 'Dear Barbara' must be playing off the term 'Dear John' which is a letter to say things are over between a couple. But since Barbara likes unicorns, the man said 'Dear Barbara???' instead. Again I am just guessing.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
the blood and semen quote refers to earlier in the movie when someone brings up that they could sell blood and semen to raise the money. the "dear Barbara" part tho I wonder myself.

"Dear Barbara" is an advise column for teenage girls so when LaFleur see's her room covered in unicorns, he thinks she should get some professional, psychological help with her 'teen age' obsession. It's funny.

"You had me at blood and semen" refers to a suggestion made earlier where they can sell their blood and semen for money. Entering the dodgeball tournament is obviously a better idea so LaFleur made a raunchy play on words from "You had me at hello" from Jerry Maguire.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?