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Hello, everyone,

“One of the most frequent problems in groupwork is that not everyone puts the same amount of effort into the task. Group members may have a different work ethic or standards for the quality of their work, and this will probably result in different levels of commitment to the group work. While different levels of commitment to the task could be partly influenced by individual workloads, there are wider factors such as individual attitudes to study. Another aspect of the same problem, however, is where one member chooses to do more work than the others. An overeager member can be irritating to the other members who then reduce their commitment to the work leaving the overeager member to get on with most of the work.”

When I rewrite the underlined part above into “Another aspect of the same problem is the case where (or, ‘in which’) one member chooses to do more work than the others.”, my question is as follows;

1) is it right that the seemingly proceding noun – ‘the case’ has been dropped in this formal sentence?

2) if so, can such proceding nouns as ‘the case, situation, circumstance, point, etc.’ (not ‘place’) be often dropped in informal style only, while I remember Swan wrote in “Practical English Usage, 3rd edition, page.498’ ”After common nouns referring to time, ‘when’ is often replaced by ‘that’ or dropped in an informal style. The same thing happens with ‘where’ after ‘somewhere, anywhere, everywhere, nowhere and place’ (but not after other words).

Your reply would be much appreciated.

*source;

https://books.google.co.kr/books?id=7fUqtYFmvTQC&pg=PA52&lpg=PA52&dq=%22Another+aspect+of+the+sam... -M4NJRukI53UJcOBpKQ&hl=ko&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPu4bn6r34AhU6sFYBHf_SBOEQ6AF6BAgCEAM#v=onepage&q=%22Another%20aspect%20of%20the%20same%20how%20the%20same%20problem%2C%20

Comments  
deepcosmos1) is it right that the seemingly proceding noun – ‘the case’ has been dropped in this formal sentence?

I don't see anything as having been dropped. My rewrite would be "Another aspect of the same problem, however, is one member's choosing to do more work than the others." But "where" can do this all by itself, and no rewrite is needed.

deepcosmos2) if so, can such proceding nouns as ‘the case, situation, circumstance, point, etc.’ (not ‘place’) be often dropped in informal style only, while I remember Swan wrote in “Practical English Usage, 3rd edition, page.498’ ”After common nouns referring to time, ‘when’ is often replaced by ‘that’ or dropped in an informal style. The same thing happens with ‘where’ after ‘somewhere, anywhere, everywhere, nowhere and place’ (but not after other words).

I am afraid I don't totally agree with Swan here. I see idiom as stronger than that, and I see things like "the day when he did it" and "the week that he did it" as verbose, an attempt to put the cart before the horse and let one's perception of grammar cloud one's idiomatic English. In your case, "where" is not strictly applicable to "circumstance" or the others, and "wherein" is closer to the required meaning, anyway. Words are indeed sometimes dropped, though, like "that" at the beginning of a clause, but yours is not the same case as Swan's. He meant that you drop "where" in things like "somewhere (where) the seagulls go".

Note:

There is no proceding in English.

preceding - coming before - from precede
proceeding - going forward - from proceed

The trick I use for these is that both words have two "e"s. In "preceding" one "e" comes before (i.e., precedes) the "c". In "proceeding" both "e"s go after the "c".

CJ

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CalifJim

Note:

There is no proceding in English.

preceding - coming before - from precede
proceeding - going forward - from proceed

The trick I use for these is that both words have two "e"s. In "preceding" one "e" comes before (i.e., precedes) the "c". In "proceeding" both "e"s go after the "c".

CJ

Oops, I made a typo, CJ. Would you kindly share me your opinion for my inquiry above?

deepcosmos1) is it right that the seemingly preceding noun – ‘the case’ has been dropped in this formal sentence?

No, not necessarily. You may as well say that "is" substitutes for "occurs", thus:

Another aspect of the same problem, however, [is/occurs] where ...

I think this is just a matter of there being several choices available to the writer. We could paraphrase with 'the case' or with 'occurs' or in other ways, but we can't say definitively that one particular way is the only way.

"is where" is such a common combination in English that it's difficult to see it as a deletion of something in "is the case where". However, deleting "the case" from "is the case where" does, usually, leave a sentence that is as correct as the original.

CJ

CalifJimNo, not necessarily. You may as well say that "is" substitutes for "occurs", thus:Another aspect of the same problem, however, [is/occurs] where ...

If the writer wrote 'occurs' instead of 'is', I didn't have any problem with the original sentence. However, once I replace it with 'occurs', my problem has suddenly disappeared, so I really appreciate your wonderful pointing.

I feel Swan's traditional and strict grammar with 'relative where/when' above is changing soft.

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deepcosmosis changing soft.

Just a brief note.

This is not natural English. Did you mean "is becoming less strict"?

CJ