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I know that we use Present Perfect Continuous in passive voice rarely, nevertheless the majority grammar books says that it can be used. When? In what type of senstences?
Can i change "I have been painting the ceiling" into passive?Thank you in advanceEmotion: smile by the way, do we say " thank you in advance", because now I'm not sure:)
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Hello Guest

I'm a learner from Japan.

To me your sentence seems to be a good example for Passive of Present Perfect Continuous.

paco
The ceiling has been being painted.

I know that we use Present Perfect Continuous in passive voice rarely, nevertheless the majority grammar books says that it can be used. When? In what type of sentences?
Can i change "I have been painting the ceiling" into passive?

RH: While the structure may be possible, it is impossible [virtually??] for this situation. Just because we can change an active into a passive grammatically, we don't just automatically do it in language.

The junior high textbooks and workbooks in Japan are full of unnatural passive constructions. Knowing how grammar works is a far cry from knowing how language works.

Are there any examples given for when this structure can be used?

=

Thank you in advance by the way, do we say " thank you in advance", because now I'm not sure:)

RH: Sure you can say that, Guest and it's quite common.
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The only context I can think of for this construction is something like this:

"The museum is closed. The ceiling is being painted."

"The ceiling has been 'being painted' for six weeks now. How long is it going to take??!!"

It's a very awkward construction, and would only be used in a very self-conscious way.

In normal conversation you would just say "They've been painting the ceiling for six weeks now." ("They" in this context is sort of an all-purpose, indefinite pronoun, when you don't really know -- or care -- who has been painting the ceiling -- in a way it serves the same function as the passive voice, in sentences like this where the passive voice is awkward to use.)
Yes, you can change "I have been painting the ceiling" into the passive - "The ceiling has been being painted by me". But in so doing you would simply be practicing a mindless exercise, because (except in some unusual circumstances, as described by khoff) nobody talks that way!

The particular tense structure you are aiming at is more comfortably used, on the very rare occasions when it is used at all, when the intent is to express a slowly evolving activity.

For example, let's say that at your company, the management has decided to go out of business. Several months into this process you may find yourself saying,

"It seems management fully intends to carry out its plan. People have been being laid off quite regularly during the past several months."

CJ
TRASK R.L., Mind the Gaffe. [url="http://www.sip.be/dpb/engels/trask_r.htm "]The Penguin Guide to Common Errors in English[/url], (Penguin Books), 2001.

"perfect progressive passive"

The perfect progressive passive is illustrated by the following example:
My house has been being painted for two weeks now.
There is nothing here which violates any rule of standard English grammar, and most speakers find such sentences entirely normal.

Guest
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I'd say that Mr Trask is mistaken. A specific search for, "My house has been being" brings up only one hit and that is Mr Trask and this example. That's not a terrific confirmation.

In these situations we tend to use the impersonal 'they'.

They've been painting my house for two weeks now.

He's right in that it has been assembled in a fully grammatical fashion.
It looks strange and ungainly when written. But 'it's been being' and 'he's been being' google fairly respectably. The context khoff points up seems quite a natural place for it.

MrP
It is not as cold as it has been being.
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