+0
I never dare use this conjuction because I don't understand it. When I came upon it in a sentence, I could usually guessed the meaning by its association with the rest of the context. But when it stands alone, I'm at a loss. So what does this one means:

"One is saved no faster than he gets (the) knowledge."

Does the use of the conjuction reveals the sequence of events? Fist comes this, and next that...that kind of thing? I know that sounds stupid, but I'm just making a wild guess here. So can someone be kind enough to help?

Thanks in advance

Raen
+0
Hi,

I never dare use this conjuction because I don't understand it. When I came upon it in a sentence, I could usually guessed the meaning by its association with the rest of the context. But when it stands alone, I'm at a loss. So what does this one means:

"One is saved no faster than he gets (the) knowledge."

Does the use of the conjuction reveals the sequence of events? Fist comes this, and next that...that kind of thing? I know that sounds stupid, but I'm just making a wild guess here. So can someone be kind enough to help?

I don't really see a meaning in your example, without having to imagine some odd kind of context. So, let's consider simpler examples.

He arrived at the airport no sooner than the plane landed. This is a slightly odd syntax. It suggests that he did not arrive at the airport before the plane landed.

A more common form of words, I think, is No sooner did he arrive at the airport than the plane landed. This suggests that he arrived and the plane landed at the same time.

'No faster' is similar.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Thank you very much Clive for your explanation.

Using the example you gave, I am wondering, other than style, if using this conjuction provides certain connotation that a simpler, straight-forward sentence would fail to carry. What's the subtle diffrence, if there is, between that and to just say: He didn't arrive at the airport before the plane landed. Or: He arrived at the airport the minute (or second, depending) the plane landed.

As for the example I provided, I got it off the billboard of a church I passed by. So "knowledge" must have to do with the bible or the words of God or something. Applying your explanation, does it mean that "One is not saved before one learned of the knowledge", and "One is saved the same time (the minutes, or as soon as, ect..) one learns of the knowledge"? close enough interpretation?

Raen
Hi,


Using the example you gave,

ie No sooner did he arrive at the airport than the plane landed.

I am wondering, other than style, if using this conjuction provides certain connotation that a simpler, straight-forward sentence would fail to carry. What's the subtle diffrence, if there is, between that and to just say: He didn't arrive at the airport before the plane landed. Or: He arrived at the airport the minute (or second, depending) the plane landed.
I see it as a matter of style. The construction is more literary, and less likely to be used in everyday casual English speech. So, a possible 'connotation' might be that the listener would think the speaker an educated person.

As for the example I provided,
"One is saved no faster than he gets (the) knowledge."

I got it off the billboard of a church I passed by. So "knowledge" must have to do with the bible or the words of God or something. Yes, I suppose so.

Applying your explanation, does it mean that "One is not saved before one learned of the knowledge", and "One is saved the same time (the minutes, or as soon as, ect..) one learns of the knowledge"? close enough interpretation? Either, I suppose. But really, the sentence as written is pretty cryptic. I'm not sure that a native speaker would write something like that.

Clive
Thanks Clive.

CliveI see it as a matter of style. The construction is more literary, and less likely to be used in everyday casual English speech. So, a possible 'connotation' might be that the listener would think the speaker an educated person.


Then I shall avoid it at all cost, I'm never a snob of any sort.
CliveApplying your explanation, does it mean that "One is not saved before one learned of the knowledge", and "One is saved the same time (the minutes, or as soon as, ect..) one learns of the knowledge"? close enough interpretation? Either, I suppose. But really, the sentence as written is pretty cryptic. I'm not sure that a native speaker would write something like that.


I've been told pamphlets, hand-outs, etc. a church produces could sometimes read like "amatuer" literacy, I've read a few like that. So I'm not surprised. Thanks again.

Raen
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies