I was reading a biography of someone who traveled among Germany, France, England and Belgium. The author often said "departed from the Contenent" and "returned to the Continent." Can anyone tell me how to determine which countries are sometimes described by this phrase?
Also, when and where is this term usually used?
Thank you.
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Mike Lepore typed thus:
I was reading a biography of someone who traveled among Germany, France, England and Belgium. The author often said "departed ... how to determine which countries are sometimes described by this phrase? Also, when and where is this term usually used?

"The Continent" is a UK term meaning Europe, excluding the British Isles.

David
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Mike Lepore typed thus:

I was reading a biography of someone who traveled among ... phrase? Also, when and where is this term usually used?

"The Continent" is a UK term meaning Europe, excluding the British Isles.

...and Ireland?
R.
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Rolleston typed thus:
Mike Lepore typed thus: "The Continent" is a UK term meaning Europe, excluding the British Isles.

...and Ireland?

I chose my terms with extreme care.
Do you consider that Ireland is not a constituent part of the British Isles?

David
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Rolleston typed thus:

...and Ireland?

I chose my terms with extreme care. Do you consider that Ireland is not a constituent part of the British Isles?

Um, no. I thought you'd written "British Islands".My only excuses are the very small font and my useless eyes.

Btw: I can't imagine all the Irish are happy with the term "British Isles". Might it not be better to sacrifice some brevity and say "Ireland and the British Islands"?

Even the term "British Islands" is not without its problems.

R.
Rolleston typed thus:
Rolleston typed thus: I chose my terms with extreme care. Do you consider that Ireland is not a constituent part of the British Isles?

Um, no. I thought you'd written "British Islands". My only excuses are the very small font and my useless eyes.

Does Free Agent not permit you to change the point size of post bodies?
Btw: I can't imagine all the Irish are happy with the term "British Isles". Might it not be better to sacrifice some brevity and say "Ireland and the British Islands"? Even the term "British Islands" is not without its problems.

That seems unnecessarily PC, especially if nobody has actually voiced this concern. It's a historical name for a geographical region.

David
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Does Free Agent not permit you to change the point size of post bodies?

It probably does. But the bits at the top take up so much space I would only be able to see a few lines at once.
(I'm using a small-screen laptop.)
Btw: I can't imagine all the Irish are happy with ... Even the term "British Islands" is not without its problems.

That seems unnecessarily PC, especially if nobody has actually voiced this concern. It's a historical name for a geographical region.

Well, it's your choice. Write whatever you feel like.

R.
"The Continent" is a UK term meaning Europe, excluding the British Isles.

There must be something special with the word "Europe", too:

Top-posting.
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Andreas Prilop typed thus:
"The Continent" is a UK term meaning Europe, excluding the British Isles.

There must be something special with the word "Europe", too:

I suspect that you have to be British to parse the UK term "Europe" correctly. Sometimes it means Europe, but sometimes it means the same as "The Continent". I can't explain how to tell the difference, but rather like the elephant we know it when we hear it.

David
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