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Sue is a smart girl. She can solve the most difficult math problems in my class.
Sue is a smart girl. She can solve most difficult math problems in my class.

Please to tell me if the 2 sentences above are correct or not? Is OK to add or delete "the" in front of "most difficult math problems"? Thanks for you help!Emotion: smile

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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

Sue is a smart girl. She can solve the most difficult math problems in my class.
Sue is a smart girl. She can solve most difficult math problems in my class.

Please to tell me if the 2 sentences above are correct or not? Yes, but they have different meanings.

"most difficult math problems" = The majority of difficult math problems. Let's say there are 100 difficult math problems. Sue can solve the majority of them, ie 51 or more. 'Most' here is a determiner.

"the most difficult math problems" Let's say there are 100 difficult math problems. 10 of them are much more difficult then the others. Sue can solve those 10. 'The most + adjective (difficult)' here makes a superlative.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Adding to Clive's reply, "most difficult math problems" can be rewritten as "most of the difficult math problems." This can clearly differentiate your sentences.

You can even put Clive's two different meanings into one sentence as follows:

Sue is a smart girl. She can solve most of the most difficult math problems in my class. However, Clive is smarter than Sue because he can solve all of the most difficult problems.
Thank you, Clive and N5pn4cya! I really appreciate your explainations.