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Do I have it right below?

References to a married couple can pose problems. When referring to the two people in the context of their wedding, treat couple as plural since they are individuals entering into a marriage.

* The couple were married last Saturday.
* After the wedding, when the two people are acting as a unit, treat couple as singular.
* That couple has been married for more than twenty years.
* Each couple has volunteered to participate in the literacy campaign.

If couple conveys the idea of two people, treat it as a plural: The couple [its members] were married. But: Each couple was asked to give $10.

criteria / criterion / parentheses/ parenthesis / data
  • No criteria have been established.
  • No criterion has been established.
  • Parentheses are required around such references.
  • The closing parenthesis was omitted.
  • The data obtained after two months of experimentation is now being analyzed.
(Here data means “information.”)
  • The data assembled by six researchers are now being compared.
(Here data refers to several distinct bits of information.)
Comments 
Hi,

Yes, you have the general idea.

I would just simply say, for a couple,

If couple conveys the idea of two people, treat it as a plural: The couple [its members] were married. But: Each couple was asked to give $10.

That seems to cover the whole situation.

Your later comments are all OK.

In everyday English, data is commonly followed by a singular verb.

Clive