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Blast. I really will have to brush up my Danish. ... for cheese flan, and b) directions to the public baths.

It's on: 1. Bus stops at one of the motorways in Copenhagen. 2. Edge vegetation along the Skjern Å {small river in Jutland}.

Yes, but that's not very amusing.
But for sure Areff does seem to have a sexual fetich on short trousers:-). Because he had to wear them as an 18-year-old Sixth Former?

Areff is an American, so he certainly won't have attended a Sixth Form. And most US schools have no uniform, so if he did wear shorts at high school then it was probably from choice.

David

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Areff is an American, so he certainly won't have attended a Sixth Form.

YACS.
And most US schools have no uniform,

Yes, that must be true. Many private schools do have uniforms, and some public schools here and there, I think mainly in poor urban districts, have been experimenting with uniforms in recent years.

My younger brother attended a public elementary school where he had to wear a nice white shirt and a green tie for "Assembly" (once a week I think). My public elementary school had no dress code, nor did my public secondary school. My elder siblings attended a public high school in Brooklyn (FLCIA) in the late 'Seventies at which wearing shorts was prohibited (except perhaps in gym).
so if he did wear shorts at high school then it was probably from choice.

Apart from gym, I didn't wear shorts in high school until the end of eleventh grade, when I went through a period where I was wearing what I suppose might be called Bermuda shorts (or something like that these were shorts that went down almost to the knees) with various kinds of buttoned shirts. I don't think those are the kinds of shorts that Danish 'boys' (men) wear. I would think that Danish 'boys' would go for the Venture Scout/Christopher Robin sort of look.
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I've never had Spanish at school, only English, German, Latin and French.

French and Latin in short trousers, French, Russian, Latin, Greek and Hebrew in longs. Later (mostly jeans), French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Swedish, Arabic and Modern Greek.

I can't speak any of them these days (thermal underwear).

Mickwick
Blast. I really will have to brush up my Danish. ... for cheese flan, and b) directions to the public baths.

It's on: 1. Bus stops at one of the motorways in Copenhagen. 2. Edge vegetation along the Skjern Å {small ... seem to have a sexual fetich on short trousers:-). Because he had to wear them as an 18-year-old Sixth Former?

Areff was a Sixth Former when he was a 4-year-old. Younger even than young Dinkin.
You really must stop trying to annoy poor Mickwick with this languages stuff. You are one over his three already. Next you will be taunting him with your Tuscan vinyard.
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Areff is an American, so he certainly won't have attended a Sixth Form.

YACS.

I went with my daughter to look at the Hill School in Pennsylvania (where James Baker was educated). They called their 11th grade "Fifth Form", and 12th grade "Sixth Form". I think they had some kind of dress code, too.
Fran
YACS.

I went with my daughter to look at the Hill School in Pennsylvania (where James Baker was educated). They called their 11th grade "Fifth Form", and 12th grade "Sixth Form". I think they had some kind of dress code, too.

Britophilia in action. That's also why US private boarding schools tend to have "headmasters" rather than principals (seen, incorrectly from what I gather, as a more AmE than BrE term (as well as suggestive of public {in the AmE sense} schoolness)).
If James Baker went there, it must be pretty snooty, though not so much that they won't admit Texans.
You mean, what James said about them to Oscar? CDB
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Areff is an American, so he certainly won't have attended a Sixth Form.

YACS.

American schools can have a sixth form, even if they don't call it thus. Americans have a foreign minister as well, read it in any German newspaper (we can't call her "Secretary of State", because that would make her a ministry official, undersecretary or something like that).
Oliver C.
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