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YACS.

I went with my daughter to look at the Hill School in Pennsylvania (where James Baker was educated). They called their 11th grade "Fifth Form", and 12th grade "Sixth Form". I think they had some kind of dress code, too.

Just been reading a book set in Pennsylvania and got a shock when one of the characters said she needed to pick up some "potted mums" (I worked out it was some kind of plant).

Rob Bannister
I went with my daughter to look at the Hill ... I think they had some kind of dress code, too.

Just been reading a book set in Pennsylvania and got a shock when one of the characters said she needed to pick up some "potted mums" (I worked out it was some kind of plant).

Was it set in Pottstown? That's where the Hill School is.

Fran
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I went with my daughter to look at the Hill ... I think they had some kind of dress code, too.

Just been reading a book set in Pennsylvania and got a shock when one of the characters said she needed to pick up some "potted mums" (I worked out it was some kind of plant).

Chrysanthemums.

Skitt
Things keep happening that no one can explain.
- Sally Brown (Peanuts).
This is an interesting topic, but a more interesting topic is the right to become a parent. Getting married is nothing because it involves few serious responsibilities and then only on occasion, but becoming a parent is something because it involves heavy responsibilities every goddamned day. Anyone physiologically capable of becoming a parent seems to have the right to become one in the US and most other countries, and in many places it is even mandatory once one is pregnant.
All this chit-chat about "rights" demonstrates that there are no such things outside the law. There are no "natural rights" or even "fundamental rights". Rights don't exist unless one's behavior is challenged, or unless the state says that you are entitled to do or have something.
So much for "natural law" and all other mystical ***.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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Jolly good show. You will have observed that Mickwick's actual curiosity was even more exploratory.

Are you accusing me of playing pocket billiards?

Well it's getting warmer, even on the Welch border I suppose, so shedding the thermal underwear would make things easier for you. But you don't really do you?
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In general, whenever I have worn shorts, and I have done so in Latvia, Germany and the USA, I have preferred to wear the Steve Irwin type, not longer ones (I had nice legs, you know).

But these days, everything shorter than Bermuda length seem almost impossible to get ;-(.

Per Erik Rønne
In general, whenever I have worn shorts, and I have ... type, not longer ones (I had nice legs, you know).

But these days, everything shorter than Bermuda length seem almost impossible to get ;-(.

Got scissors?

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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In US movies I've seen that they distinguish between "shorts" and "undershorts":-).

"Undershorts" is used, but I think it's uncommon, and I think something of a euphemism.

I've seen it used when people wore ordinary shorts as well as "undershorts". How else would you distinguish?

Per Erik Rønne
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My grammar school had so many pupils staying on for Oxford & Cambridge entrance exams after A-levels that they had a separate, named Year. So there was the Lower Sixth (what you might expect), the Middle Sixth (A-level year) and the Upper Sixth (post A-level).

But how, then, did you distinguish between the sets? Upper Lower Sixth - lower set of Upper Sixth{grade 13} or upper set of Lower Sixth {grade 11}? We simply call them the 1st, 2nd and 3rd grade of the "gymnasium" - and I've chosen to translate it into English "11th, 12th and 13th grade".

Per Erik Rønne
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