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Esteemmed teachers,

Which of the following is right:
1)
A: The unprecedented economic growth only added to the divide between the rich and the poor.
B: Unprecedented economic growth only added to the divide between the rich and the poor.

Let's assume that it was not mentioned in the previous context.
I'm guessing A here, because it is referring to specific economic growth, namely the one which was "unprecendented."
Is B ever right?

How about here:
C. Economic growth only adds to the divide between the rich and the poor.
Is this correct?

2)
A: Despite the unprecedented economic growth in recent years, the rich have become richer and the poor even poorer.
B: Despite unprecedented economic growth in recent years, the rich have become richer and the poor even poorer.

I'm guessing A, because the author expects readers to be aware of the recent economic growth.
Since it is a current event and is "unprecedented," isn't it logical to assume that the readers are cognizant of this growth?
But the article used B. Why is that?

3)
A: Mr. Chairman, the esteemed members of the Committee, thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to appear before this very prestigious group.
B: Mr. Chairman, esteemed members of the Committee, thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to appear before this very prestigious group.

I'm guessing A again, because the speaker is mentioning particular members. But B is used instead. Please explain this to me.

Thank you
Comments  
Hi Optimus,

1)
A: The unprecedented economic growth only added to the divide between the rich and the poor.
B: Unprecedented economic growth only added to the divide between the rich and the poor.

Let's assume that it was not mentioned in the previous context. If it has not been mentioned before, then don't say 'the'. Consider a simpler example. Heavy rain flooded the town rather than The heavy rain flooded the town.



How about here:
C. Economic growth only adds to the divide between the rich and the poor.
Is this correct? Yes. Same comment as above.

2)
A: Despite the unprecedented economic growth in recent years, the rich have become richer and the poor even poorer.
B: Despite unprecedented economic growth in recent years, the rich have become richer and the poor even poorer.

I'm guessing A, because the author expects readers to be aware of the recent economic growth. Well, A is correct if the author expects the readers to be aware.
Since it is a current event and is "unprecedented," isn't it logical to assume that the readers are cognizant of this growth? Well, it depends on who the author expects the readers to be. Some readers know a lot of things, some know very little.

But the article used B. Why is that? Well, it suggests that the author did not expect his readers to have this in their mind.

3)
A: Mr. Chairman, the esteemed members of the Committee, thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to appear before this very prestigious group. The use of 'the' suggests or implies that some members of the committee are not esteemed. Do you think this is what the speaker has in mind?

B: Mr. Chairman, esteemed members of the Committee, thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to appear before this very prestigious group. This suggests that all the members are 'esteemed'. The committee will hear this more happily!

If you have any more questions about this, please write again.

Clive

Clive, thank you for the excellent explanation!

paco
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Yes, thank you so much. You explained it perfectly clear.
Clive B: Mr. Chairman, esteemed members of the Committee, thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to appear before this very prestigious group. This suggests that all the members are 'esteemed'. The committee will hear this more happily!
But how about this: "Mr. Chairman, the members of the Committee, thank you very much..."
Is this also right?

Thanks.
Hi again,

Here's my thinking on this.

When we speak directly to someone, we don't use 'the'. eg I say 'Thanks, mother', not 'Thanks, the mother'. The term 'mother ' is treated as a title. Same thing with 'Good evening, ladies and gentlemen' rather than 'Good evening, the ladies and the gentlemen'.

And same thing with addressing people directly as 'Esteemed members of the Committee'.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi Clive,

"I like the teachers at my school." and "I like all the teachers at my school."

Do they both mean I like every teacher at my school? If so, which one is more preferable?

And how about this: "I like the nice teachers at my school".

Does it imply some teachers at my school aren't nice? If so, how can I make a sentence like "The teachers are nice at my school and I like them all" more concise and formal?

Thanks.
Hi,

"I like the teachers at my school." and "I like all the teachers at my school."

Do they both mean I like every teacher at my school? Yes, but #2 stresses the idea more, emphasizes that there are no exceptions. If so, which one is more preferable? Both are OK.

And how about this: "I like the nice teachers at my school".

Does it imply some teachers at my school aren't nice? It leaves it as a possibility. If you say this, much depends on your intonation. If so, how can I make a sentence like "The teachers are nice at my school and I like them all" more concise and formal? Just say it as you did at the start of this post.


Best wishes, Clive