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1. Could you please tell me the difference between grip and grasp?

2. What's the difference between grip something and grip on something? Do you say grasp on something?

3. What's the difference between tug and pull? And what's the difference between tug something , tug on something and tug at something?

4. What's the difference between pull something and pull on something? Do you say pull at something?

Sorry to bother you with so many questions..

Thank you for answering those questions !!!
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Davidrock651. Could you please tell me the difference between grip and grasp?

2. What's the difference between grip something and grip on something? Do you say grasp on something?

3. What's the difference between tug and pull? And what's the difference between tug something , tug on something and tug at something?

4. What's the difference between pull something and pull on something? Do you say pull at something?

These are fun ones, David.

1. Grip is usually more literal than grasp, which can mean an understanding or "what you can hold on to." There's an expression that says a man's reach should exceed his grasp, meaning that he should try for more than he can actually do. But you can also refer to someone who has a grip on someone else, meaning that other person is in his power. But if you mean literally holding something firmly in your hand, generally, I'd use grip.

2. There's not much logical difference: Grip the post firmly: grip is the verb. Get a good grip on the post: grip is the noun - the act of gripping. I think you only grasp on metaphorically. I can't quite grasp on to the image of my little girl all grown up. But others may say that they do use grasp as a complete synonym for grip.

3. Tug has more of a "jerky" connotation. You can pull gently and smoothly, but you generally tug at something quickly. I don't know if there's a difference between tugging on and tugging at. Anybody have ideas here?

4. If you pull something, you take it entirely out. You pull weeds from your garden, or the dentist pulls a tooth. To "pull on" (or at) doesn't necessarily mean it came out. "I pulled on it with all my might, but it stayed there." But Arthur pulled the sword from the stone.

If you have any specific examples that seem confusing, put there here and we'll have another try at it.
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2. I'd prefer grip about objects with a handle:

I gripped the racquet/hammer tighter.

GG's right IMO when she says:
I think you only grasp on metaphorically.

3. Tugging is pulling harder, even in the dictionaries.
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2. There's not much logical difference: Grip the post firmly: grip is the verb. Get a good grip on the post: grip is the noun - the act of gripping.

Can I use grip on something as a verb? If used as a verb, does it mean differently from grip something?
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Can I use grip on something as a verb? If used as a verb, does it mean differently from grip something?

I think you can, but I don't know that you gain anything by it. Grip on to the post firmly vs. Grip the post firmly? They seem the same to me. Are you writing a technical manual? Or is there a sentense somewhere that doesn't seem to work well for as you as written?
There's also the verbal phrase 'grasp onto', which is like 'grip', meaning to take a tight hold of [something often physical, not abstract].

With his foot snagged in the rocks of the swirling water, he frantically reached out to grasp onto the spinning raft.