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Hello teachers,

I have a question, please.

-Most people never come into contact with violent crime.

Can I use "never get into contact"? If not, what's the difference between both?


Thank you

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MoonriseCan I use "never get into contact"?

No.

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Moonrisenever come into contact

The contact just happens to people in an unplanned sort of way.

Moonrisenever get into contact

People seek out the contact. If I want to get in/into contact with you, I have to act. For example, I write an email or I pick up the phone and call you.

CJ

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AlpheccaStars
MoonriseCan I use "never get into contact"?

No.

Thank you.

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CalifJim
Moonrisenever come into contact

The contact just happens to people in an unplanned sort of way.

Moonrisenever get into contact

People seek out the contact. If I want to get in/into contact with you, I have to act. For example, I write an email or I pick up the phone and call you.

CJ

So, can I say that "come into contact" is abstract while "get into contact" is concrete?

May you rephrase the same sentence "Most people never come into contact with violent crime" in other words, in which we get the same meaning?

Thank you very much

MoonriseSo, can I say that "come into contact" is abstract while "get into contact" is concrete?

I suppose it's more or less like that. Yes.

MoonriseMay? you rephrase the same sentence "Most people never come into contact with violent crime" in other words, in which we get the same meaning?

Do I have permission to rephrase that sentence? I don't think you intended to say that.

It should be

Can you (please) rephrase the sentence ...?


Most people never come into contact with violent crime.
~ Violent crime never [touches/affects] the lives of most people.

CJ

CalifJim
MoonriseSo, can I say that "come into contact" is abstract while "get into contact" is concrete?

I suppose it's more or less like that. Yes.

MoonriseMay? you rephrase the same sentence "Most people never come into contact with violent crime" in other words, in which we get the same meaning?

Do I have permission to rephrase that sentence? I don't think you intended to say that.

It should be

Can you (please) rephrase the sentence ...?


Most people never come into contact with violent crime.
~ Violent crime never [touches/affects] the lives of most people.

CJ

Thanks a lot for clearing it up.

Regarding "May", as I understand, it's not always about permission. It can be used to ask for doing something. Yes, I meant exactly "Can you (please) rephrase the sentence ...?"

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MoonriseRegarding "May", as I understand, it's not always about permission.

Possibility and permission are the two main uses. Of the two, possibility is the most frequently used.

— Where is Peter?
— I don't know. He may be at the library.
(It is possible that he is at the library. / Maybe he's at the library.)

May I open the window?
— Yes. Please do. It's getting stuffy in here.
(Will you give me permission to open the window?)


That said, we never ask "May you ...?".

For possibility: Do you think you may/might ...?
For permission: Are you allowed to ...?

CJ

CalifJim
MoonriseRegarding "May", as I understand, it's not always about permission.

Possibility and permission are the two main uses. Of the two, possibility is the most frequently used.

— Where is Peter?
— I don't know. He may be at the library.
(It is possible that he is at the library. / Maybe he's at the library.)

May I open the window?
— Yes. Please do. It's getting stuffy in here.
(Will you give me permission to open the window?)


That said, we never ask "May you ...?".

For possibility: Do you think you may/might ...?
For permission: Are you allowed to ...?

CJ

At first, thank you for paying my attention to this point. I always thought that this is one of the easiest rule in English. I might need to modify my understanding regarding its usage, though.

Based on my understanding, "May" is comprehensive in a way that can be used for asking others politely to do something. And based on the context, we could tell whether it's a permission, possibility or just asking politely others to do something. For instance, "May I have your name, please?" instead of "What's your name?" Or "Could you give me your name, please?"

Frankly, it crossed my mind to use "Can you rephrase the sentence...etc" although "Could", that you stated, sounds better but, I haven't used it because I knew you can.

"Could" haven't crossed my mind even though it's really suitable to that context.

When I used "May" in that context, I felt it gave the meaning of possibility (Is it possible? Could you?) and asking respectfully to do something (Do this) in the same time. I guess I use it a lot especially in writing. It just flows as smooth as water. You don't feel the meaning in the same way, right?

Now, I'd like to to make sure of my understanding.

It would be wrong to say "May I have your name?" Or "May you give me your name again?" when I don't mean "permission", right?


Thanks a lot

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