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Although we should refrain from using hyphens when we can, I believe the two examples below have entirely different meanings, and the hyphens are essential to show that difference in meaning.

Do you agree that both examples below are correct?

three-hour-long meetings = meetings that last three hours each

three hour-long meetings = three separate meetings, each of which lasts an hour

Thanks.
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Yes, three hour-long meetings are three meetings, each an hour in length.
Yes, a three-hour-long meeting is one meeting that lasts three hours.

I don't agree we should refrain from using hyphens. We should use them whenever they are necessary or helpful.
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Hi,

I'd say native speakers often avoid such multi-hyphen phrases.

I'd prefer to say, as GG did, 'a meeting that lasts three hours'.

Or simply 'a three-hour meeting / three-hour meetings'. 'Long' is simply implied.

Clive
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Comments  
CliveI'd prefer to say, as GG did, 'a meeting that lasts three hours'.
Or simply 'a three-hour meeting / three-hour meetings'. 'Long' is simply implied.

Hi, CLive

How would you say it if the meeting were 1 hour?

'three one-hour meetings'
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Hi,

Yes.

Clive
Me too.

Yes, I agree.

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