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In teaching English, can the direct method be applied in higher-level classes? If not, I'd like to know why? Thanks in advance.
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AnonymousIn teaching English, can the direct method be applied in higher-level classes?
Of course! It works better with students that already have the basics of the language.
Mister Micawber AnonymousIn teaching English, can the direct method be applied in higher-level classes?Of course! It works better with students that already have the basics of the language.
It does? Personally, I feel it is extremely limiting. It is based on repetition of the same phrases over and over again. You can obviously ask open questions after your own questions (that'd require more time to prepare than one might imagine, if you wanted to prepare a set for, say, 18 people), but with weaker students it will be too challenging (there are such Ss in every group) and you might end up devoting too much time to certain individuals, if you wanted to make it more effective, and the rest would get bored quite fast. On the other hand, if Ss are good enough, you might end up trying to make the talkative Ss stop talking, while the other ones, who are not to be involved at such a point, would, again, get bored quite fast. So imho it might work only to some degree and only as one of the methods employed during the lesson. In my experience it'll be more effective, if you choose Ss randomly and you use different meanings of the words in (the) question. Just my two cents, based on my personal experience with this method. I remember I imagined that if I learnt a new language using this method, and it was on a higher level than Elementary/lower Pre-Intermediate, I'd be wasting my time. But, you know, whatever works, really.
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The 'direct method' is simply using L2 in all instruction, systemet.
Uh, you have to use L2 only, but this is not the essence of this method. You might be thinking about something a bit different. Take a look
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That seems to be just one instructor's idea of how to do it, systemet. Don't take that too much to heart.
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I'm sorry Mister Micawber, but I must diagree for the sake of other people who read the forum. Maybe you just do not know this, I have no idea, but the "direct method" is a proper name of a method following very specific rules and it is based on repetition, even a mindless one as it often is on lower levels of the related Callan method. There are many methods other than the grammar-translation method than demand the use of the S2 only. I do not want in any way undermine the trust in your here, no sir, you are the forum veteran. I just wanted to point out that the answer is not so simple and that maybe anyone who's going to read this thread should do some further research on the matter, that's it.

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S.
systemetbut the "direct method" is a proper name of a method following very specific rules
Perhaps in the minds of its former proponents, but the BBC definition is quite simple and the only practical one:

The direct method of teaching was developed as a response to the Grammar-Translation method. It sought to immerse the learner in the same way as when a first language is learnt. All teaching is done in the target language, grammar is taught inductively, there is a focus on speaking and listening, and only useful ‘everyday' language is taught. The weakness in the Direct Method is its assumption that a second language can be learnt in exactly the same way as a first, when in fact the conditions under which a second language is learnt are very different.

Example: The teacher explains new vocabulary using realia, visual aids or demonstrations.

Aspects of the Direct Method are still evident in many ELT classrooms, such as the emphasis on listening and speaking, the use of the target language for all class instructions, and the use of visuals and realia to illustrate meaning.

No one attempts to use any strict version of the original method, so there is little danger of disillusioning students. I doubt it was the intent of the OP, either. Be that as it may, I have been teaching students since 1967 (Berlitz was a strong proponent of the direct method at that time) "in the target language, teaching grammar inductively, focussing on speaking and listening, and only useful ‘everyday' language."