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Hi

Could you please explain the red part to me? Does it refer to the shark that was splitting it?

Both arms stopped flailing the water and the head went under and came up again. A cloud of blood welled up and darkened the sea. Two six-foot thin brown shadows backed out of the cloud and then dashed back into it. The body in the water jerked sideways. Half of The Big Man's left arm came out of the water. It had no hand, no wrist, no wrist watch.

But the great turnip head, the drawn-back mouth full of white teeth almost splitting it in half, was still alive. And now it was screaming, a long gurgling scream that only broke each time a barracuda hit into the dangling body.

Thanks,

Tom

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Mr. TomWould you say that this line would be easy to understand for a native speaker who is not into reading?

No. I don't understand what's going on there.

I think 'it' refers to the 'turnip head', but I have no idea what it's supposed to be the head of.

CJ

Comments  
Mr. TomCould you please explain the red part to me? Does it refer to the shark that was splitting it?

No. The lips were stretched in a grimace of pain so much that the mouth looked like a gash.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Thanks, Anon.

Would you say that this line would be easy to understand for a native speaker who is not into reading?

[At first I did think that the red part could be about the victim, but then I felt there would be no it: almost splitting in half--the (victim's) mouth almost splitting in half]

But the great turnip head, the drawn-back mouth full of white teeth almost splitting it in half, was still alive.

Tom

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.