Today's Helsingin Sanomat, a Finnish newspaper, lists the hoarding preferences of some nationalities in these coronavirus times.

Sweden: People buy rice, pasta and snuff. There's not much toilet paper on the shelves in supermarkets. Sweden being the home country of meatballs, it's perhaps understandable that minced meat also sells in large quantities. However, there is no shortage of any kind of foodstuffs. Many Norwegians have come to Sweden to buy alcohol as it is more expensive in Norway.

Estonia: Estonians have hoarded potatoes says Andres Soots, a sales manager in southern Estonia. Supermarkets in Tallinn and Tarto have ordered three times the normal amount of potatoes. Garlic is also in great demand because people believe it has a good influence on their health. There is no scientific proof for that, though.

Toilet paper also sells well, and so does strong alcohol. It's so strong that people use it as a disinfectant.

Germany and the Netherlands: According to Der Spiegel, Germans started to hoard canned food and pasta at the end of February. There were also increased sales of toilet paper and disinfectants.

United States: Americans prepare for bad times by buying guns. Ammo.com says there was a 70 percent increase in sales in one week toward the end of February.

Russia: The sales of canned meat and fish have increased. Grain products are also selling well. Especially in big cities such as Moscow and St Petersburg people are also hoarding pasta and pickles. Some sales increased by 79 percent at the beginning of March.

CB

Cool BreezeUnited States: Americans prepare for bad times by buying guns. Ammo.com says there was a 70 percent increase in sales in one week toward the end of February.

That's not surprising. Two unhealthy obsessions are never far away in the US. The subjects of race and guns.