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Another outrage of American English foisted upon us.

It makes good sense to me. What do you Brits call it, Antehalloween?

It'd make sense if it was usually used to mean what you think it means. In fact, "Halloween Eve" usually "means" (in Dolt-speak) the time after dusk on October 31. This kind of usage should have a name - "Greetings-card English"? As you and I both know, "eve" means "the day before". Most marketing people don't give a stuff about the integrity of the language though (and most of them left school at 12 so they're able to operate in blissful ignorance of any facts about their culture which might intrude on the traditions they invent to grow some other heathen's business), which is I guess how such twee bollocks as "Halloween Eve" is given wings.

Adrian
"Hallowe'en Eve" flashed the huge strapline on a British television programme on Friday afternoon. And the presenters went on to talk about it entirely unselfconsciously. I can't remember seeing this particular construction before; no doubt others have.

Why, just the other day I noticed it on a site about the "War of the Worlds" radio broadcast of Oct. 30, 1938 (under discussion over in alt.folklore.urban):
http://www.space.com/sciencefiction/phenomena/war worlds hoax 991029.html It seems appropriate that Orson Welles and the
Mercury Theater chose Halloween Eve as the night
on which they would present their 1938 CBS radio
adaptation of Wells' novel, perhaps the single
greatest media hoax of all time.
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"Hallowe'en Eve" flashed the huge strapline on a British television ... remember seeing this particular construction before; no doubt others have.

Another outrage of American English foisted upon us. Adrian

Can the Hallo-weenies be far behind?
It makes good sense to me. What do you Brits call it, Antehalloween?

It'd make sense if it was usually used to mean what you think it means. In fact, "Halloween Eve" usually ... of usage should have a name - "Greetings-card English"? As you and I both know, "eve" means "the day before".

According to both AHD and MW, 'eve' can mean either the evening (time after dusk) or the whole day before a special day.
Most marketing people don't give a stuff about the integrity of the language though (and most of them left school ... to grow some other heathen's business), which is I guess how such twee bollocks as "Halloween Eve" is given wings.

It's amazing how they function at all. Still, someone apparently tried to narrow the meaning of Halloween from the whole day to just the time after dusk. And for most people, they probably succeeded.

john
Say DJ, do you pronounce "Halloween" like "Holloween"?

You're a closet AEUer, aren't you?

Now that was beyond cruel and uncalled-for!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Now that was beyond cruel and uncalled-for!

Comma after "Now."

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
"Hallowe'en Eve" flashed the huge strapline on a British television ... remember seeing this particular construction before; no doubt others have.

Why, just the other day I noticed it on a site about the "War of the Worlds" radio broadcast of Oct. 30, 1938 (under discussion over in alt.folklore.urban):

No doubt all this tangentialling is deliberate, but just in case it's not, the real point of the original post was in the title.

Philip Eden
Now that was beyond cruel and uncalled-for!

Comma after "Now."

The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
(snip)
According to both AHD and MW, 'eve' can mean either the evening (time after dusk) or the whole day before a special day.

Really? You amaze me. So "Christmas Eve" has two meanings? "New Year's Eve" has two meanings? LOL
Of course "eve" itself has two meanings**, but once it's put into context it only has one meaning. "Emotion: poolparty Eve" means "the day before Emotion: poolparty".*** Period. Trying to use the other meaning in this context is plain stupid.
Most marketing people don't give a stuff about the integrity ... how such twee bollocks as "Halloween Eve" is given wings.

It's amazing how they function at all. Still, someone apparently tried to narrow the meaning of Halloween from the whole day to just the time after dusk. And for most people, they probably succeeded.

Nonsense. It's just an affectation, and people who use "Halloween Eve" do so in situations where "Halloween" or "Halloween Night" would be better.

**In fact, three: 1. evening (poetic); 2. the night or the whole day before a festival; 3. the time just preceding an event. Of these, the most "alive" meaning is the third.
**Halloween is a contraction of "All Halloweds Even", meaning the day before All Saints' Day.
Adrian
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