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A throwaway "now" at the beginning of a sentence takes a comma.

Why? I know you won't say "Because it does", so I won't bother to warn you not to even think about doing so.

Cor blimey, because it is an interjection.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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Why?

Because.
I know you won't say "Because it does", so I won't bother to warn you not to even think about doing so.

Always a mistake to second-guess me...
That's just the rule. "Now," "well," "you know" they all take commas when they're throwaways.
It's particularly useful in the case of a word like "now" because the presence or absence of a comma immediately let's the reader distinguish between the throwaway "now" and "now" meaning "at this time," thus eliminating the possibility that the reader will misread the sentence and have to go back and read it again, this time the right way.

Similarly, the presence or absence of a comma helps the reader to distinguish between the two "you know"s(1): "You know, I really hate that" vs. "You know I really hate that, so why are you doing it, you ***?!"
Rules of punctuation exist to help the reader accurately interpret the sentence. One decides to use a comma based on the rules or possibly because it's necessary for clarity's sake. But you don't make the decision whether or not to use a comma based on "hearing" a pause.

(1) Hate that. Hate it, hate it, hate it!

Dena Jo
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Cor blimey, because it is an interjection.

I need to learn to use big words like "interjection."

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
Rules of punctuation exist to help the reader accurately interpret the sentence. One decides to use a comma based ... clarity's sake. But you don't make the decision whether or not to use a comma based on "hearing" a pause.

Thank you for the thoughtful response!
I'd rewrite that para. as follows:
Punctuation exists to help the reader accurately interpret the sentence. Once decides to use a comma based on whether it's necessary for the sake of clarity. If there is no ambiguity, use a comma to indicate a pause.

Matti
we doan need no steenkin' Rules
Punctuation exists to help the reader accurately interpret the sentence. Once decides to use a comma based on whether it's ... If there is no ambiguity, use a comma to indicate a pause. Matti we doan need no steenkin' Rules

We will forever disagree on that, but it was fun.
Oh, and Oy!

Dena Jo
Without rules! there: be anarchy,
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
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The omission of that comma has been one of my ... group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.

I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make the slightest pause after the "Now" unless I was portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.

But English has not been on a strictly elocutionary style of punctuation for about three hundred years. There are plenty of times we put in commas for strictly grammatical reasons. regardless of whether there is a pause or not.
You do see the difference between these two, right?

Now that we're here...
Now that is good.
It's the second one that demands a comma.

Best Donna Richoux
Cor blimey, because it is an interjection.

I need to learn to use big words like "interjection."

Shouldn't that be "interjeculation"?
Philip Eden disguised as GWB
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To even things up, I now join Matti's team,
in opposition to Ms. Goodwench's team.
A comma after now would be a detriment in the original sentence. I would be wondering why it was separated from
the rest of the sentence. (To emphasize the "nowness"?)

Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
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Comma after "Now."

The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.

We differ. "Now that was beyond belief" doesn't deserve a comma. "Now, let's talk about something beyond belief" does. Where there is emphasis - however mental - on the word following "now", no comma should be expected.
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