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Why? I know you won't say "Because it does", so I won't bother to warn you not to even think about doing so.

Cor blimey, because it is an interjection.

It's not really, like, a proper interjection. A proper interjection is, well, like that like and that well. That throwaway "now" at the beginning of a sentence is a prejection, surely chucked afore, not amid.

Ross Howard
Cor blimey, because it is an interjection.

It's not really, like, a proper interjection. A proper interjection is, well, like that like and that well. That throwaway "now" at the beginning of a sentence is a prejection, surely chucked afore, not amid.

Sounds good to me.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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Of course "eve" itself has two meanings**, but once it's put into context it only has one meaning. "Emotion: poolparty Eve" means "the day before Emotion: poolparty".*** Period.

I disagree. To me "Emotion: poolparty Eve" means primarily 'the night before Emotion: poolparty' (or, rather, 'the night on which Emotion: poolparty starts, which is prior to the day of Emotion: poolparty'), but can be extended to mean 'the day before Emotion: poolparty'. If someone asks me what I'm doing on New Year's Eve, I assume they don't want to know what I'm doing the morning of the 31st, but the evening and night; but on the morning of the 31st, I might say "Today is New Year's Eve."
I don't use "eve" in this sense very much, except for "New Year's Eve" and the very few occasions I have to refer to Christmas Eve. I do use "erev" in this same sense, though - both the basic 'evening' sense and the extended 'day' sense, that is - including for days which are not Jewish holidays: "I won't be able to drive home on Wednesday the 26th, since my boss won't give me erev Thanksgiving off."
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
}
}> The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of }> the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I }> think they are commaphobic.
}
} My comma pet peeve is the omission of the comma before a noun of } address.
My, comma pet peeves are getting a lot of attention lately!

R. J. Valentine
Comma after "Now."

The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.

Now, now.
Areff was 100% correct in not using a comma there, though. (You can't be right every time, Skitt.)

Charles Riggs
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We differ. "Now that was beyond belief" doesn't deserve a comma. "Now, let's talk about something beyond belief" does. Where there is emphasis - however mental - on the word following "now", no comma should be expected.

On the contrary, the emphasis on "that" merely underscores the throwawayness of "now"; therefore, it requires a comma.

Dena Jo, who, BTW, says Holloween
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I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make ... portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.

But English has not been on a strictly elocutionary style of punctuation for about three hundred years. There are plenty of timeswe put in commas for strictly grammatical reasons. regardless of whetherthere is a pause or not.

Of course, but I do think that punctuation has to serve the twin masters of grammar and sight-reading; sometimes these pull the same way and sometimes there's tension. My instinct is to use light elocutionary punctuation, and it's very rare that this conflicts with the requirements of grammar. I suspect there's a good reason for that.
You do see the difference between these two, right? Now that we're here... Now that is good. It's the second one that demands a comma.

I agree, but then I'd give it a pause in speech anyway to distinguish it from the "Now that is good (but it wasn't before)" reading. So it's the pause and the stressing which determine the comma. It's perfectly elocutionary, and nothing to do with grammar.
Your examples lead me to assume that, like me, you wouldn't have used a comma in the original example is that right?
Matti
You do see the difference between these two, right? Now that we're here... Now that is good. It's the second one that demands a comma.

I agree, but then I'd give it a pause in speech anyway to distinguish it from the "Now that is ... me to assume that, like me, you wouldn't have used a comma in the original example is that right?

The original being R F's?
Now that was beyond cruel and uncalled-for!

No, I would liken that to "Now, that is good," not "Now that we're here..." I'd put a comma. "Now, that was beyond cruel..."

The other kind is almost indivisible. It reminds me of some similar words in Dutch that are used to introduce clauses, like nadat, zodat, and totdat. You can't break up "Now that" in "Now that we're here...", it might as well be one word. Notice that it introduces a clause, whereas the other "now" prefaces an entire sentence.

More examples.
Now that you're finished, we can...
Now that that's settled, why don't...
Now that they're married, I suppose they...
Other kind:
Now, that's no way to behave.
Now, that is possible.
Now, that can be a problem.
I suppose I have to acknowledge the general comma-less trend and the social peer pressure to drop commas on every conceivable occasion. Once we've seen "Now that's no way to behave" a million and a half times, it looks fine.

Best Donna Richoux
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I suppose I have to acknowledge the general comma-less trend and the social peer pressure to drop commas on every conceivable occasion. Once we've seen "Now that's no way to behave" a million and a half times, it looks fine.

Just like "noone", in fact...
Matti
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