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on 03 Nov 2003:
I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make ... portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.

But English has not been on a strictly elocutionary style of punctuation for about three hundred years. There are plenty ... grammatical reasons. regardless of whether there is a pause or not. You do see the difference between these two, right?

This question would be better put as "Do you see a difference between these two?" for two reasons. The lesser is that there is no necessary difference between the two, and the greater is that you assume the truth of what you want to demonstrate with this structure.
Now that we're here...

This needs no comma.
Now that is good.

This may or may not need a comma, depending on what it is supposed to mean, depending on whether "Now" means nothing and might as easily be replaced by "Wow" or "Boy" or "Jeez", or whether it means "This time" or "At this moment".
It's the second one that demands a comma.

Not necessarily. Where is the stress in this sentence?
(snip)

According to both AHD and MW, 'eve' can mean either the evening (time after dusk) or the whole day before a special day.

Really? You amaze me. So "Christmas Eve" has two meanings? "New Year's Eve" has two meanings? LOL Of course "eve" ... "Emotion: poolparty Eve" means "the day before Emotion: poolparty".*** Period. Trying to use the other meaning in this context is plain stupid.

Wrong. Since Halloween already has '-even' incorporated, conveying the meaning of 'the day before', the added 'Eve' can only mean something different: the evening of the specified day.
on is

It's amazing how they function at all. Still, someone apparently ... time after dusk. And for most people, they probably succeeded.

Nonsense. It's just an affectation, and people who use "Halloween Eve" do so in situations where "Halloween" or "Halloween Night" would be better.

'Eve' means something different than night. 'Halloween Eve' has a perfectly unambiguous meaning. It is uttered and understood by people who aren't necessarily dolts.

john
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I suppose I have to acknowledge the general comma-less ... behave" a million and a half times, it looks fine.

Just like "noone", in fact...

Yes, yes just like that ghastly!

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
}> The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of }> the best writers contributing ... of the comma before a noun of } address. My, comma pet peeves are getting a lot of attention lately!

It has to do with Boy George having been featured on US TV talk shows recently.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
You do see the difference between these two, right?

This question would be better put as "Do you see a difference between these two?" for two reasons. The lesser is that there is no necessary difference between the two,

In my opinion, there is a decided difference between the two.
and the greater is that you assume the truth of what you want to demonstrate with this structure.

Then I must have chosen exactly the right words, because I did assume that I wanted to demonstrate was true. I was not consulting Matti for his judgement or opinion, I was trying to show him something and find out whether he saw it the same way. "You do see this, right?" says that.

I'm saying it various ways here and I can't come up with any that means anything at all unless there is a comma. Whether I wanted to say "Finally, at last, at this moment, this thing is good," or "Jeez, think it over, that really is good," it still requires a comma after the "Now."
I gave more examples in a follow-up post, which may be better.

Best Donna Richoux
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We differ. "Now that was beyond belief" doesn't deserve a ... on the word following "now", no comma should be expected.

On the contrary, the emphasis on "that" merely underscores the throwawayness of "now"; therefore, it requires a comma.

You go, girl! I'm with ya'!
I'm truly amazed at the responses of some of the writers here who are otherwise fairly skilled in presenting their thoughts in print. Come to think of it, "amazed" is not the right word. "Shocked" is. But so it goes ...

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
The omission of that comma has been one of my ... group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.

Now, now. Areff was 100% correct in not using a comma there, though. (You can't be right every time, Skitt.)

I hate to contradict you (and put you in a sack with them*), but this is one of the times when I *am right. Don't feel bad you have lots of company, it seems.
There are some excellent writers posting in this group, but we are talking about the finer mechanics of written expression now something that on occasion has not been done well even by some published and even famous writers.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Just like "noone", in fact...

Yes, yes just like that ghastly!

You're incorrugatable. Donna said "fine", not "ghastly", and these weren't synonyms last time I checked.
Matti
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'Eve' means something different than night. 'Halloween Eve' has a perfectly unambiguous meaning. It is uttered and understood by people who aren't necessarily dolts.

People need a name for the 30th of October? I don't think so.

As someone pointed out, "Halloween" itself means "All Hallow's Eve" and means the night before All Saints Day (Nov. 1).
I didn't save the numbers when I checked the other day, but there's something like 4 million uses of "Halloween" on the web and only 4,000 or so uses of "Halloween Eve." It does exist, as a term, but it's not comparatively widespread.

Best Donna Richoux
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