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Hi, I'd like to know if the above expression is correctly used in the following sentence:

"Confidence in science constitutes the basis for denying the existence of moral values".

Thanks,

Sextus
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Comments  (Page 3) 
SextusBy the way, is there a problem with "local character"?


I'll just take this one question,for now. Which emphasis do you want?

1) "...in closing her discussion of...contemporary ethical skepticism, she points out that this skepticism “is essentially local, ..."

2) "...in closing her discussion of the local character... she points out that this skepticism “is essentially local, ..."
I want the second one.

Sextus
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The sentence preceding this can be compressed into, "Annas's remarks seem not only to report, but to attempt to show". If this refers to the preceding sentence, the compressed version would read semantically, and quite nonsensically, as 'the seeming nature of Annas's remarks is only apparent'; (i.e., It only seems to be the case that her remarks seem to be what you say they are.)

By the way, it is Annas's, not Annas'.
I think I can't compress it, because I would lose the sense. You are indeed right about your remark regarding "seem"-"apparent" (an important error). What if I say this:

"At first glance, Annas’ remarks regarding the status of science do not merely intend to report the fact that contemporary ethical skepticism predominantly adopts a non-skeptical attitude towards science, but to attempt to show that it is not possible to espouse this skepticism unless one believes in the descriptive and explanatory power that science has, in practice or in principle. However, this is only apparent, since in closing her discussion of the local character of contemporary ethical skepticism, she points out that this skepticism “is essentially local, a part of a globally unsceptical world-view which is likely to be scientifically based…”"

By the way, is my interpretation - to which I referred in a previous post - of "likely" here correct?

Regarding the possessive, I do think that both versions are possible when a name ends with "s". Isn't this right?

Sextus
Sextus

Regarding the possessive, I do think that both versions are possible when a name ends with "s". Isn't this right?

I'll take the easy part for now, and leave the harder part for later, or for MrP.

As far as I know, the rule for the possessive of a name that ends in s is-- s's. What I believe you're thinking of is the possesive of a noun made into a plural by the addition of an s.

The bishop's crimes. (One bishop.)
The bishops' crimes. (More than one bishop.)
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No, no. I was thinking of the plural forms of names ending in "s". I've seen it used several times. I'll try to find an example.

Sextus
Sextus I take "likely" ... to mean here that it is quite possible

Yes. Likely to be = probably is.

Exception defined in no.2 on this page: http://grammar.uoregon.edu/case/possnouns.html
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Sextus"At first glance...''

Can you tell me simply-- because I still can't get it --what is it that is only apparent?
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