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In any case it was not until Lady Thatcher had managed to tidy upmost of the wreckage left by Old Labour that the UK was in a positionto pay anybody anything;

Or, on the other hand, it took John Major and Ken Clarke to clear up the bombed site her stark raving staring-eyed small-town lunacy created after Healey had got on top of the Macmillan-Wilson mess. You want to handbag, darling? OK, let's handbag!
Mike.
I don't remember Healey getting on top of anything, except possibly Mrs Healey. Wartime communist, a "soak the rich until the pips squeak" left-wing appeaser, a chancellor who had to go to the IMF to get a $3.9 million loan, and fiscal policies that led to the winter of discontent. Just another country-wrecking politician, just like all of the others. I wouldn't give you tuppence for a dozen of them.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
The America Mr Jefferson envisioned hasn't come about.

(snip)
Convene a Constitutional Congress to rewrite the document with the driving factors being

(snip)
to criminalize gun ownership

I just wanted to highlight the incredible lack of historical perspective present in the above. Jefferson would be spinning in his grave..
Aaron Davies
Opinions expressed are solely those of a random number generator. "I don't know if it's real or not but it is a myth." -Jami JoAnne of alt.folklore.urban, showing her grasp on reality.
I think he's been spun to death already.
=20
dg (domain=3Dccwebster)
Yet Mr Beveridge didn't explain himself. No. Instead he segued off on a non-sequitur and delivered a lot of flannel about gratitude. Very odd.

Faux naivete on your part? An unstraight lawyer, odd? ?

Adrian
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Ob Socialist nomenclature: Is a Brother a Comrade?

A good question, citizen.
It's difficult to say. According to Google, the two honorifics are often bestowed in tandem, which should imply that they mean different things. It's difficult to pin down a difference, however. A definition of 'comrade' offered at the funeral of the ANC's Dumisani Makhaye suggests that 'comrade' is higher up the socialist pecking-order than 'brother' (or 'sister') but, to the untrained consciousness, the attempt to differentiate is not wholly convincing.
We have gathered here today in KwaMashu, in great numbers, to say farewell to a great patriot we are proud to call a comrade. There are many of us in this province and elsewhere in our country who see and describe ourselves as the comrades of the late Dumisani Makhaye.
And I think I know that we know what we mean when we use the word comrade. We mean more than a brother or a sister. We mean a fellow fighter for freedom and development, to whom we are tied by a shared and solemn commitment to serve the people of South Africa.
We use the word comrade as soldiers speak about their fellow combatants as comrades-in-arms, amafela ndawonye. We use it to identify those in our society who are ready and prepared to sacrifice everything to achieve the goals we have set ourselves, as we engage in struggle to eradicate the legacy of colonialism and apartheid and achieve the objective of a better life for all our people.
The most glaring weakness in this argument is that we (we in the wider world anyway) speak about fellow combatants as 'brothers-in-arms' as often as we speak about them as 'comrades-in-arms'.

So here, as elsewhere, 'brother' and 'comrade' appear yet again to be as commonsensically and self-evidently interchangeable as they are dogmatically immiscible, distinct and in all respects wholly separate things.
Commonsense, communard, communundrum. Where lies the answer?

Is the frequent side-by-side, apparently tautological use of 'comrade' and 'brother' a class-historical result of some famous revolutionary citizen or other having once said something famous about 'comrades and brothers'? Or is this impenetrable double-usage issue just a symptom of the earnest long-windedness of those who would try to explain and improve the world?
We could say much, much more about all this but we find that we have been distracted by something else.
*
'Amafela( )ndawonye' is interesting. To an outsider who only knows what Google knows, and who doesn't even know what language the phrase/word is from (Hlubi?), it appears to be a bit ironic that it should be linked with the memory of an ANC suit like Dumisani Makhaye. Back in the '20s, the Amafelandawonye - always translated on the Web as 'Die-Hards' - were mostly rural, Africanist (but Christian) traditionalists who, led by women, opposed the ANC's alien (and male?) socialist solutions to colonial oppression.
Does anyone here know anything about what 'amafelandawonye' means - in all senses - in modern South Africa? It doesn't have much of a Web presence but it looks like it's one of those concepts that everyone wants to be associated with. Web-hits include a couple of obvious 'comrade' synonyms, a burial society, and vigilantes opposed to youth crime.
*
Comrade-brother Dumisani Makhaye seems to have been reviled in leftist circles as a compromising moderate. In moderate circles, he was reviled as a 'mumpara'.
'Mumpara' appears to be a Tsotsitaal word meaning 'not streetwise'.

Tsotsitaal appears to be a lingua franca emerging in South Africa's urban districts. Sophiatown leads.
Comments?
(Hello, Brother Steve!)

Mickwick
I'm gonna ask you comrade and brother
How do you treat your own woman back home
She got to be herself
So she can give herself
Does anyone here know anything about what 'amafelandawonye' means - in all senses - in modern South Africa? It doesn't ... be associated with. Web-hits include a couple of obvious 'comrade' synonyms, a burial society, and vigilantes opposed to youth crime.

I forgot the most interesting use: as a synonym for stokvels, or savings clubs.
A stokvel is a group of friends who contribute an amount each month, say R500. In a stokvel of 12 friends, each person gets one chance a year to take home the month's collected cash. So once a year each person in the group gets a lump sum of, in this case, R6 000.
Urban legend has it that stokvels are so addictive that members sometimes save enormous amounts relative to their earnings.

http://www.btimes.co.za/99/0613/btmoney/money09.htm

Comrade Mick
Ob Socialist nomenclature: Is a Brother a Comrade?

A good question, citizen.

(-)
'Mumpara' appears to be a Tsotsitaal word meaning 'not streetwise'. Tsotsitaal appears to be a lingua franca emerging in South Africa's urban districts. Sophiatown leads. Comments?

They'll all be dead by 1990, according to the BBC. Is that what you meant?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Does anyone here know anything about what 'amafelandawonye' means - in all senses - in modern South Africa? It doesn't ... be associated with. Web-hits include a couple of obvious 'comrade' synonyms, a burial society, and vigilantes opposed to youth crime.

"Amafelandawonye" means political die-hards. Not burial societies, but "We will die in this place" in the sense of "we will never give up." Think of "The Red Flag": "beneath its shade, we'll live and die."
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