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Yes, I got that impression too. But given the history of who did what to whom, I think it's generally easier, and fairer, to make Whites cope with Black prejudice than the reverse.
perhaps will, borrow more from this complex and interesting language.

Why pick that one, when there are so many others? Because it's the source of "Bwana" and "Hakuna Matata"?

Ndio, Padri Bwana. Mimi sikuna matata. And because it's already been picked as a regional language, and somewhat simplified for use (kwa mujibu wa mwalimu wangu), by many people in several African countries. CDB
Where would you start? Usually English seems to ... one it would save us a lot of mouth-soaping, eh?

And the spell-checker wouldn't have to handle the feelthy thing. I suspect the waSwahili have a word for it, but ... thinking of substituting for English words like "racial" designations, which have history and connotations now embarrassing to us. CDB

I lent a book of Zanzibari proverbs and idioms to(!#**?!) about five years ago. I'm almost certain it contains an equivalent of je ne sais quoi, probably involving goats and wells. (I bet it has one about never lending books/goats, too.) If/when I can ever persuade (!#**?!) to give it back (he thinks he has more use for it than I do, therefore it is his) I'll let you know.

Mickwick
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"Amafelandawonye" means political die-hards. Not burial societies, but "We will die in this place" in the sense of "we will never give up." Think of "The Red Flag": "beneath its shade, we'll live and die."

Ah! I get it now. That's 'comrade' all done and dusted. Thanks.

However, I did find references to literal burial societies - to 'informal self-insurance schemes, which absorb the costs of social activities and cultural requirements of funerals'. (Their viability is threatened by the massive increase in the death rate due to AIDS.)

It's possible that the death reference is more or less coincidental in this case. General savings clubs - stockvels - seem to have been called amafelandawonye (singular? plural?) before specialized burial societies came along, and amafelandawonye and its more common variant uMfelandaWonye (a version in a different language?) are used as synonyms for 'co-operative'.
But then there's the other sort of burial society, also called amafelandawonye or uMfelandaWonye, for which the death reference was perhaps intended as a macabre joke - the vigilantes who kill stock thieves and witches in the Eastern Province and operate some sort of murderous protection racket. (In the early days at least, there seems to have been some sort of connection with the Inkatha Freedom Party.)

More innocently, there's uMfelandaWonye waBantu baseMjondolo, the South African Homeless Peoples' Federation, which, like the original uMfelandaWonye/amafelandawonye of the 1920s, is led by women.

I tell ya, South Africa is a fascinating place. Very complex (and more than a little tragic).
Amagqabantshintshi?
*
Some Xhosa terms generated at a workshop hosted by the Western Cape Legislature.
Accountant Umlawuli-zimali
Affirmative action Inkqubo yokukhawulelana
nabobabengenamalungelo ngaphambili
Auditor Umphicothi-zincwadi
Claim (expenses) Ibango, umz.leendleko
Comments Amagqabantshintshi
E-mail Ucingo lwezonxibelelwano lwezekhompyutha High blood pressure Uxinzelelo lwegazi
In duplicate Iikopi ezimbini
In triplicate Iikopi ezintathu
Initiative Ilinge
Mission statement Inkcazo yomnqophiso
Norms (also values) Izithethe
Overtime Ama-ova
Sexual harassment Udlakathiso ngokwesondo
Strategy Sicwangciso
Strategise Ukugwadla iqhinga
Values (also norms) Izithethe

Mickwick
(snip Tsotsitaal and Fanagalo.)
Thanks. Very interesting. (Or, as Ali G might say, booyakasha!)
The strongly-emergent lingua franca in contemporary South Africa, by the way, is English. I'm even tempted to say, "American English."

Oh well. That's usondelelwaniso lwamazwe for you.

Mickwick
"Mompara" appears all over Southern Africa" a a term of ... a mompara, say. A possible polite translation is "ne'er-do-well."

I've since found "mampara" in an Afrikaans dictionary: "ass, fool; raw Bantu" it says.

('Bantu' is a bit broad for a dictionary, no?)
I found a mention of another Afrikaans dictionary which says it might come from a Malay word meaning 'newly' - this because it was often applied to klutzy servants: 'newly hired'. Sounds a bit Webtastic, if you know what I mean.
(Incidentally, I meant to type 'mampara', not 'mumpara' in my last post. My 'moderates reviled ...' thing was an extrapolation of Mr Makhaye having been voted 'Mampara of the Week' by readers of the Sunday Times. Possibly an extrapolation too far. I have no idea whether the readers of the Sunday Times are moderate. It was late. Extrapolation is a lot easier after midnight.)

Mickwick
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'Mumpara' appears to be a Tsotsitaal word meaning 'not streetwise'. ... franca emerging in South Africa's urban districts. Sophiatown leads. Comments?

They'll all be dead by 1990, according to the BBC. Is that what you meant?

Do you mean Sophiatown? I think I saw that documentary but I didn't make the connection with this book
http://www.unisa.ac.za/default.asp?Cmd=ViewContent&ContentID=13497

Tsotsitaal: a dictionary of the language of Sophiatown . I misunderstood the blurb and thought that Tsotsitaal was a recent phenomenon, not something that emerged from somewhere that was bulldozed a long time ago. (Earlier than 1990, no?)

Mickwick
Do you mean Sophiatown? I think I saw that documentary but I didn't make the connection with this book http://www.unisa.ac.za/default.asp?Cmd=ViewContent&ContentID=13497 ... a recent phenomenon, not something that emerged from somewhere that was bulldozed a long time ago. (Earlier than 1990, no?)

Maafkan sahaya, tuan. 2090.
Ususally spelt "mampara", at least in the "Sunday Times", which has a column that publishes the "Mampara of the week" and the "Mampara of the year", usually a politician who has put their foot in it.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Tsotsitaal appears to be a lingua franca emerging in South Africa's urban districts. Sophiatown leads.

"Taal" is the Afrikaans for "language," but it's one of those universally-known words that's a loan-word in just about every ... if he doesn't, he'd rather like you to think him capable of doing it at the drop of a hat.

Morlikely originates in a Sotho language. The "ts" sound is rare in Xhosa or Zulu, and cognate words in those languages usually have a z where Sotho/Tswana have a "ts". See, for example, the historical figure Mzilikzi (Zulu), known in the Sotho/Tswana area as "Moselikatse".
So "Tsotsitaal" is cool, hip, young-peoples' slang partly designed to be inpenetrable to old farts and the un-cool and partly ... The strongly-emergent lingua franca in contemporary South Africa, by the way, is English. I'm even tempted to say, "American English."

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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