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I've since found "mampara" in an Afrikaans dictionary: "ass, fool; raw Bantu" it says.

('Bantu' is a bit broad for a dictionary, no?)

In the old South Africa a "a raw Bantu" was a black country hick in official Nat PC speak.
I found a mention of another Afrikaans dictionary which says it might come from a Malay word meaning 'newly' - ... idea whether the readers of the Sunday Times are moderate. It was late. Extrapolation is a lot easier after midnight.)

I suppose it is moderate. Fewer bums and boobs than "City Press" (and also fewer stories about "Celeb bewitched my girlfriend"). But more than the "Sunday Independent", which is the intalekshil paper.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
"Amafelandawonye" means political die-hards. Not burial societies, but "We will ... "The Red Flag": "beneath its shade, we'll live and die."

Ah! I get it now. That's 'comrade' all done and dusted. Thanks. However, I did find references to literal burial ... and amafelandawonye and its more common variant uMfelandaWonye (a version in a different language?) are used as synonyms for 'co-operative'.

"Umfelandawonye" would be a member, rather than the society itself.
But then there's the other sort of burial society, also called amafelandawonye or uMfelandaWonye, for which the death reference was ... (In the early days at least, there seems to have been some sort of connection with the Inkatha Freedom Party.)

The Inkatha Freedom Party was never strong in the Eastern Cape.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
('Bantu' is a bit broad for a dictionary, no?)

In the old South Africa a "a raw Bantu" was a black country hick in official Nat PC speak.

Ah! I misread that as '... raw. (Language:) Bantu.'

(In official National Party-speak?)
I have no idea whether the readers of the Sunday Times are moderate. It was late. Extrapolation is a lot easier after midnight.)

I suppose it is moderate. Fewer bums and boobs than "City Press" (and also fewer stories about "Celeb bewitched my girlfriend"). But more than the "Sunday Independent", which is the intalekshil paper.

As it is here.
Thanks.

Mickwick
General savings clubs - stockvels - seem to have been ... in a different language?) are used as synonyms for 'co-operative'.

"Umfelandawonye" would be a member, rather than the society itself.

Hmm. Are you sure?
The high-level meeting with the burial society, known as the Amafelandawonye, was announced today ...
The feud erupted when people in Qumbu formed an organisation called Umfelandawonye (people who die together) Burial Society allegedly aimed at killing stock thieves and witches.

THERE is no doubt that for many years stokvels
(amafela-ndawonye) have been one of the most effective agents of delivering development services which could not be provided by the formal business sector in South Africa.
People are queuing to join the Umfelandawonye "to die in unity" self protection units being trained in northern Zululand, Inkatha Freedom Party Transvaal spokesman Humphrey Ndlovu said on Thursday.
Also, the Western Cape legislature has offered 'Umfelandawonye' as an official Xhosa equivalent of 'co-operative':
http://www.capegateway.gov.za/eng/pubs/guides/E/94792/2
(In the early days at least, there seems to have been some sort of connection with the Inkatha Freedom Party.)

The Inkatha Freedom Party was never strong in the Eastern Cape.

Yes, sorry. It looks like that was a different Umfelandawonye. The Inkatha militia was in northern KwaZulu-Natal; the vigilantes-cum-racketeers - Umfelandawonye wa Bufuyi - were in the east of the Eastern Cape. (Transkei?)

Mickwick
In the old South Africa a "a raw Bantu" was a black country hick inofficial Nat PC speak.

Ah! I misread that as '... raw. (Language:) Bantu.' (In official National Party-speak?)

That is korrekt; now, hang on to your hat for the official demise, recently announced, of said party. The end of a nearer, eh?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
official

Ah! I misread that as '... raw. (Language:) Bantu.' (In official National Party-speak?)

That is korrekt; now, hang on to your hat for the official demise, recently announced, of said party. The end of a nearer, eh?

Whereas the old National Party is alive and well in the Democratic Party... but that's straying a bit from language and usage.

The term "raw Bantu" was one of those politically-correct changes that could be made with the search and replace function of a word processor, just substituting "Bantu" for "kaffir" everywhere it occurred. Not that there were many word processors around when the change was made (in the 1950s, I believe). It caused me some embarrassment at school when I was in primary school, where the same Afrikaans reader had three versions in the differennt editions in the class. The most recent had "Bantoe", others had "naturel" and mine had "kaffer".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
"Umfelandawonye" would be a member, rather than the society itself.

Hmm. Are you sure? The high-level meeting with the burial society, known as the Amafelandawonye, was announced today ... The ... Ndlovu said on Thursday. Also, the Western Cape legislature has offered 'Umfelandawonye' as an official Xhosa equivalent of 'co-operative': http://www.capegateway.gov.za/eng/pubs/guides/E/94792/2

I'm not all that sure, since most people I know who belong to burial societies and stokvels aren't Xhosa speaking, and I'm not a fundi on Xhosa.

I just would have expected that if the singular of the society was "umfelandawonye" the plural would have been "imifelandawonye" rather than "amafelandawonye".
The Zulu nation (and football club) are known as "AmaZulu), but a member of the Zulu nation is "umZulu". "IZulu", the singular of "amaZulu", means sky or heaven.
The Inkatha Freedom Party was never strong in the Eastern Cape.

Yes, sorry. It looks like that was a different Umfelandawonye. The Inkatha militia was in northern KwaZulu-Natal; the vigilantes-cum-racketeers - Umfelandawonye wa Bufuyi - were in the east of the Eastern Cape. (Transkei?)

Around here there is a protection racket/security company called "Mapogo a Mathamaga".
And that reminds me that an Aerican, who was a fan of the "Madam and Eve" cartoon strip, once asked about the term "armed response", as he had not heard it before, and it makes me think it may be peculiarly South African.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
I'm not all that sure, since most people I know who belong to burial societies and stokvels aren't Xhosa speaking, ... as "AmaZulu), but a member of the Zulu nation is "umZulu". "IZulu", the singular of "amaZulu", means sky or heaven.

I think I'm starting to understand. I assumed that the spelling variations were more or less random and insignificant (mostly because that's how the newspapers seem to employ them).
'Imifelandawonye' appears on about a dozen non-English Web-pages (Zulu?) and it appears together with 'umfelandawonye' on one of them, so it looks like you're right about the correct singular and plural constructions.
That's not how they are used in English-language newspapers, though.

This footnote from a paper on 'Witchcraft and transnational social spaces' by Dirk Kohnert (I've lost the URL) suggests a possible explanation for some of the spelling variations in the newspapers:

Umfelandawonye, or Mfelandawonye, literally 'those who die in the same place', or in short 'we die together' had its roots in a traditional burial society. The similarity, at least in name, to the Amafelandawonye resistance movement of Hubli (sic) women in Herschel in the 1920s mentioned above, was striking and probably intended. According to Peires (1999: 7), the name, deliberately archaic in tone, had been part of the traditional political vocabulary of the Transkei. By referring to these historical roots the vigilante group possibly sought to legitimate its activities.
(It goes on to compare the Mfelandawonye to the Mapogo A Mathamaga.)

The English-language newspapers seem to use 'amafelandawonye' and 'umfelandawonye' willy-nilly. The same version might be used when talking about savings clubs, burial societies, housing co-operatives, Zulu militias, Mpondo vigilantes or honoured comrades and it might be used when talking about either one instance or a thousand of any of those things, but there seems to be no reliable way of predicting which version will be used.
The Hlubi protest movement of the 1920s, however, is always given as 'Amafelandawonye' (as far as I can see). This is said to be archaic Xhosa, or Mpondo, or whatever it is ..
Oh lawks, I'm getting lost.
There are far too many possibilities and I know shag-all about any of them.
I give up.
All I know for sure is that there is some sort of wiggly and linguistically legitimate line connecting the Hlubi boycotters of Herschel, the Mpondo murderers of Qumba and that poor old Mampara of the Week mouldering in his grave over in KwaMashu and that the newspapers don't always stick to it.
Around here there is a protection racket/security company called "Mapogo a Mathamaga". And that reminds me that an Aerican, who ... "armed response", as he had not heard it before, and it makes me think it may be peculiarly South African.

Armed private security guards?

Mickwick
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I'm not all that sure, since most people I know ... "umZulu". "IZulu", the singular of "amaZulu", means sky or heaven.

I think I'm starting to understand. I assumed that the spelling variations were more or less random and insignificant (mostly because that's how the newspapers seem to employ them).

Zulu has nine noun classes (roughly equivalent to genders, if things are to agree in gender, number and case) though some people say there are 18 clases, counting singulars and plurals separately.
Class 1 is umu- aba- (and, in some cases, u- o-)
umuntu - a person
abantu - people
It is the personal class, and it is invariably applied to people.

umfundi (reader, learner) abafundi (readers, learners)

Class 2 is um- imi-
umfula - river
imifula - rivers
Sometimes called the "tree and river" class, because a lot of names of trees and rivers are in this class.
Class 3 is i- ama-
itshe - a stone
amatshe - stones
ilanga - sun, day
amalanga - suns, days
Class 4 is isi- izi-
isibaya - kraal/corral
izibaya - kraals/corrals
Class 5 is in- isin-
ingwe - leopard
izingwe - leopards
and so on.
So it's not random.
When Zulu words are borrowed by English, they are usually Anglcised by dropping the prefix, and adding an English suffix:

umZulu - a Zulu
amaZulu - the Zulu nation
isiZulu - the Zulu language
KwaZulu - Zululand
But people are not always consistent about how they do this.
'Imifelandawonye' appears on about a dozen non-English Web-pages (Zulu?) and it appears together with 'umfelandawonye' on one of them, so ... (as far as I can see). This is said to be archaic Xhosa, or Mpondo, or whatever it is ..

The Ama- prefix is often used for groups of people in Zulu & Xhosa, and as far as I know it's not archaic. The English are amaNgisa, the Afrikaners amaBhunu, and so on, as in the old song (sung to the tune of "Clementine")

Mayibuye, mayibuye,
mayibuy' iAfrika
Eyathathwa ngamaNgisi
sisasebumnyameni.
which being interpreted is:
Let it return (3 times) Africa
which was taken by the English
while we were still in darkness.
Oh lawks, I'm getting lost. There are far too many possibilities and I know shag-all about any of them. I ... Mampara of the Week mouldering in his grave over in KwaMashu and that the newspapers don't always stick to it.

Around here there is a protection racket/security company called "Mapogo ... it makes me think it may be peculiarly South African.

Armed private security guards?

Privatised policing - Maggie Thatcher's dream.
Your house has a burglar alarm, and when it goes off it alerts the security company, who send an armed fellow with a bulletproof vest to see what's going on.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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