+0
Hi,

I have a couple of questions in the sentence below, which I found on NPR's website.

"So as one of the few political scientists who's actually lived in Libya, --"

a) I think "a few" means "a small number of" and "few" means "hardly any." So how do you judge the meaning if, like this sentence, "the few" is being used. Depending on the context?

b) I think "who're" is correct. Is "who's" also correct? Also, sometimes I see sentences in which "there's" and "the plural of a noun" are being used, for instance, "there's umbrellas. Is that OK?

Thanks,
M
+0
mitsuwao23"So as one of the few political scientists who's actually lived in Libya, --"
This isn't a sentence as the main clause is incomplete. However the is used correctly and is due to the relative clause. In nearly all similar sentences, the plural should be used in the relative clause: So, as one of the few political scientists who have actually lived in Libya... Are is totally wrong in this sentence.

Another example: Neil Armstrong is one of the few people who/that have walked on the moon.
mitsuwao23"there's umbrellas. Is that OK?
From a strictly grammatical point, it incorrect. However, it is very common in informal speech. I wouldn't recommend using it in serious writing.

CB
Comments  
mitsuwao23b) Also, sometimes I see sentences in which "there's" and "the plural of a noun" are being used, for instance, "there's umbrellas. Is that OK?
Yes, that's OK in spoken English.
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.