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Fox Mulder, standing on a field where he believes he died on in one of his past lives, speaks: "At times, I almost dream. I, too, have spent a life thes ages' way and tread once more familiar paths. Perchance, I've perished in an arrogant self-reliance an age ago, and in that act, a prayer for one more chance went up so earnest, so... Instinct with better light let in by death that life was blotted out not so completely, but scattered wrecks, enough of it to remain dim memories... as now... when seems once more the goal insight again."

I have a problem with this beautiful text. First, "...spent a life thes ages' way..." Is this some ancient word or construction or do you think it is a misspelling and it should be "these ages' way"? Mulder sounds like saying "thes", not "these".
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Even though this is a rather old thread, I thought maybe someone else might happen by here, curious about Fox Mulder's lines and wondering what he was really saying. So, I'm going to re-quote the excerpt from Browning's work, Paracelsus, and directly afterwards "translate" it into something perhaps much easier to understand...but certainly not as pretty.

"[...]at times I almost dream
I too have spent a life the sages' way,
And tread once more familiar paths. Perchance
I perished in an arrogant self-reliance
Ages ago; and in that act, a prayer
For one more chance went up so earnest, so
Instinct with better light let in by death,
That life was blotted out—not so completely
But scattered wrecks enough of it remain,
Dim memories, as now, when once more seems
The goal in sight again."

Sometimes I think about the possibility that I've had past lives, and that I once spent one as a wise man...and that I'm doing it once again in this life. I might have died ages ago still arrogantly self-reliant; and, seeing then my error, pleaded for a chance to do it all over again. In that moment of self-inspection, a better version of me took my place. However, the new "me" did not completely annihilate the old "me"...enough was left behind so that I could know that there once was another life I'd led. And now, here I am again...looking like I'm going to need another chance to do it all over again, just like before.

Watching the episode "The Field Where I Died", the theme is clearly right in line with Paracelsus's musing.
The text Mulder speaks at the end of this particular episode comes from a play by Robert Browning, entitled Paracelsus. He doesn't quote it exactly verbatim, but this is definitely the poem he is recalling from memory, perhaps from his days at Oxford.
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it's probably "the sage's way"
text is perfectly correct... English constructs used appear to be very old and out of use.

THES is a very old usage for conjucation. Here I think it means "that"

My understanding (paraphrase):

At times I almost dream,

I have spent a life that way before

And tread once more familiar paths. (as a consquence of realization in the previous line)

Perhaps, I've perished in an arrogant self-reliance an age ago, (relates to and expounds on the realization of past life)
And in that previous act, a prayer for one more chance was requested earnestly/seriously
Instinct with better understanding let in by death; that life was blotted out not so completely,
But scattered wrecks (of life), enough of it to remain dim memories(understanding persisting through death leading to instinct)...

As now... when seems once more,... the goal insight again. (The relevance of those dreamy recollection of a past life clear; as the goal is in sight again)
The line is 'I spent a life the sage's way." from the poem "the field where I died" by Robert Browning.
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its 'The sages'way"
When I heard this spoken I heard " Sages' Way " . This meaning a wise person .
...spent a life the sage’s way.
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