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Try to see if the following is correct:

The first part of something
Eg Set off at the __ of the road.
Correct Options:
- start
- beginning
(PS: Please suggest any other words if possible)

The last part of something
Eg Go right to the __ of the road.
Correct Options:
- end
(PS: Please suggest any other words if possible)

Not queue up, unfairly get something without waiting properly
Eg: Relating to the queue, it is impolite to __
Correct Options:
- jump the queue
(PS: Please suggest any other words/phrases if possible)
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Comments  
Your correct options and my additions (not many!):

'Set off at the __ of the road.'
- start
- beginning
- head

'Go right to the __ of the road.'
- end

'Relating to the queue, it is impolite to __.'
- jump the queue
- cut into the queue
Thanks a lot.
I would like to have more options because:
- more variations in the passage.
- if you forget one option, you still have another option to replace.

^^
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Other options for first two sentences:

'Top' of the road
'Bottom' of the road

Also,

...it is impolite to 'push in'


'Top' of the road
'Bottom' of the road
Head of the road (by Mister Micawber)


To me, I feel they are not appropriate.
The meaning is slightly changed.

A road can starts at the bottom. We will still call it at the beginning/start of the road, but not the above suggestions, vice versa.
Any discussion is perfectly welcome.
Set off at the beginning of the road.
Start at the beginning of the road.
(I don't use "the start of the road".)

Start at the beginning. Finish at the end.

Go right to the end of the road.

(In California we don't use the word "queue". We use "line".)
It is impolite to cut in line.
It is impolite to cut in front of somebody.
It is impolite not to wait your turn.

beginning of the line, end of the line
beginning of the movie/play/concert/lesson/book, end of the movie/play/concert/lesson/book
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Thanks for your idea.
I saw more phrases relating to queue

Take the queue/line
Faill in queue/line

Does anyone know what they mean?
To me, "fall in line" means to line up in a row (said to a group of people to get them organized into an orderly line) or, more idiomatically, to acquiesce (as in "Robert had trouble following orders, but after his father gave him a strict talking-to, he finally fell in line.")

"fall in queue", "take the line", and "take the queue" mean nothing to me. I've never heard them.
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