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May I use "the former" and "the latter" in two different paragraphs?

Because I wrote a lot after "the former", and the topic I want to introduce with "the latter" is totally different from the previous part.


Thank you for your help!

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AVMay Can I use "the former" and "the latter" in two different paragraphs?

"May" implies a polite request.

AVI wrote a lot after "the former", and the topic I want to introduce with "the latter" is totally different from the previous part.

It's hard to say without looking at the entire text. Can you post it below?

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Something like that:

Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium has been developed to find a solution to the Lucas critique and to set up micro-based macroeconomic models. The former refers to the criticism moved by the economist Robert Lucas in 1976. In his paper, Lucas argues that the macro-econometric models used at that time for policy evaluation were not suitable for this task. This was due to idea that the relationships between variables are not stable, but they change as different economic policies are applied. ...

The latter ...

AVMay I use "the former" and "the latter" in two different paragraphs?

Former/latter is always bad style, but in your case, it is not even applicable. When I got to "former", I had to stop and think "of what two things?", and it took me a while to dig them out, partly because you set up two infinitive clauses and then try to refer back to a noun phrase buried in a prepositional phrase within the first clause. In fact, I can't tell what the latter is going to be, the setting up of micro-based macroeconomic models or the models themselves. There is nothing wrong with repeating yourself. Usually.

"The Lucas critique is the criticism offered by …." ("move" seemed like a wrong word)