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According to Michael Swan's Grammar Book,we use the future perfect when talking about time and with " by,within,next or this like this year...etc"

Examples:

1-I'll have been twenty five this january

2-I'll have been finished my studies by october

Is it possible to talk about place instead of time ?

I'm driving and I'm talking to my friend telling him I'll have done 30 km in certain place.

In other words,I'm driving and I'm talking about how many kilometers I'll have done reaching a certain place.
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Comments  
Yes.
I will have driven 30 km when I reach Phoenix.

My version is something of a compromise, because "when I reach" is an expression of time.

I'll have done 30 km in Phoenix doesn't quite work.

I'll have done/driven 30 km at the state line. Same problem. With the right context, people would understand what you mean. But it's not something a native speaker would say.

Perhaps,

Where are you? (reply) Amarillo.

Have you driven 300 miles? (reply) No, I'll have driven 300 miles in Phoenix.
Avangi
I'll have done 30 km in Phoenix doesn't quite work.


well,here you said it doesn't quiet work,so why it is perhaps correct in this sentence :

Avangi
Perhaps,

Where are you? (reply) Amarillo.

Have you driven 300 miles? (reply) No, I'll have driven 300 miles in Phoenix.

Is it because we have a conversation-like ?
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everlastinghope Is it because we have a conversation-like ?
Yes. It sneaks the time factor into the context.

We constantly have to deal with the problem of "no-context" sentences on the site.
A given sentence may be "unacceptable" in isolation, but when the sentence is "set up" by prior context, we take some of the words differently, and the sentence "sounds" natural to us.
I can't think of any instances in the past year in which I had used future perfect. I am sure it has its places in the language but how useful ? Well, to me, it's like the stuffs we keep piling on the garage shelves, which we don't remember having. If we don't touch them for 3 years, we can do without them.Emotion: big smile
Still, if you have that disease, it's comforting to know they're there. Emotion: nodding
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AvangiStill, if you have that disease, it's comforting to know they're there.

If this is a punch line of a joke, it just went over my head Emotion: geekedEmotion: snail
Oh dear. Emotion: embarrassed

Books have been written about the mentally deranged people who collect and save things like pack rats. I can't think of the term for it.

If you can throw something away simply because you haven't used it for three years, then you're a normal, healthy person. Unfortunately, some of us can't do that.
everlastinghope well,here you said it doesn't quiet work,so why it is perhaps correct in this sentence :
I tried to think of an example completely free of time references, but couldn't. (when, etc.)

But I was just talking with my son about my posts, and thought this might be an example:

With 300 more posts, I will have reached 10,000.

"More" and "reached" can refer to quantities of distance rather than time, and no prior context seems to be necessary with this sentence.
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