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I'm pretty sure I've encountered this expression (the green buck) before. It was used in reference to the dollar...(or so I guessed). Googling it doesn't yield very informative results. So I'm asking it here.

What does it mean?
Could you use it in a sentence please?!

Thanks
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Greenback.
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Oops! Thanks for the correction! Now I've found a dictionary entry.

I gather then that saying I have five greenbacks doesn't mean I have five dollars but I have five (dollar) bills. Or do we say that?
Is there any slang for 'coin'?

Thanks
'Five greenbacks' is indeed five dollar-bills, but the term is old-fashioned now, and only occurs in old detective novels.

Coins are generally just 'change' or 'small change' (which can also refer to a considerable amount of money when used by a rich man).
Thanks very much for this information MM.
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A relative gave me some green bucks means a relative gave me some dollar bills???

anonymousA relative gave me some green bucks means a relative gave me some dollar bills???

No. 'Greenbucks' is not English. Try 'greenbacks' or 'sawbucks'.

In our english subject we are discussing about slang and there is the sentence "A relative from abroad gave me some green bucks". And i know the slang is green bucks but we really need the meaning of it
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park blue 524And i know the slang is green bucks but we really need the meaning of it

No, it is 'greenbacks', and you obviously have not read this thread, which clearly explains the meaning.

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