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The house was just such as I had pictured it from Sherlock Holmes’s succinct description, but the locality appeared to be less private than I expected. On the contrary, for a small street in a quiet neighbourhood, it was remarkably animated.

A Scandal in Bohemia, short story

Hi. Would it make sense if I say “The house was just such as I had pictured from Sherlock Holmes’s succinct description” (delete “it”)? Because “such as” means “of a kind that” here.

Thank you.
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zuotengdazuoWould it make sense if I say said“The house was just such as I had pictured from Sherlock Holmes’s succinct description” (delete “it”)?

Omitting "it" sounds strange to our modern ears, but it's possible that in the nineteenth century it would have been accepted that way. I don't know, but if I read it without the "it", I would understand it and accept it as a linguistic quirk from another time. Nowadays we'd leave out "such" and include "it".

CJ

Comments  

Doyle is not modern English as it is used nowadays. It is also not American, of course. I would never write that the way he did. I would write "The house was just as I had pictured it …." I believe that Doyle's "such" has a different implication than our modern ears register. I would say that "it" is indispensable.

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Leaving out the "it" would make the sentence ungrammatical. If you want a shorter sentence, the following would be okay, although less literary:


The house was just as I had pictured it from...

The house was as I had pictured it from...

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJim
zuotengdazuoWould it make sense if I say said“The house was just such as I had pictured from Sherlock Holmes’s succinct description” (delete “it”)?

Omitting "it" sounds strange to our modern ears, but it's possible that in the nineteenth century it would have been accepted that way. I don't know, but if I read it without the "it", I would understand it and accept it as a linguistic quirk from another time. Nowadays we'd leave out "such" and include "it".

CJ

Thank you, CJ.But as far as old-fashioned English goes, isn’t it strange to include “it” in the such-as clause?For example, Catelyn Stark stared at Tyrion with a coldness on her face such as he had never seen. (From Game of Thrones)We wouldn’t say “Catelyn Stark stared at Tyrion with a coldness on her face such as he had never seen it.”, would we?How are these two examples different?
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zuotengdazuoHow are these two examples different?

I wish I knew. That is quite a curious pair of examples you've found!

house just such as I had pictured it
coldness such as he had never seen

We can speculate at length, but I don't think that will help.

CJ