Hi,

Can "a" distribute to a noun requiring "an"?

Eg, It may be followed by a noun, verb, conjunction, or adjective.

Or must I say, ". . . . by a noun, verb, conjunction, or an adjective." ?

Thanks!

- A.
There's no grammatical need to use an, but if you like it, you certainly can!

Emotion: beerEmotion: beer
Thanks, CB! Emotion: beer Emotion: beer

For some reason, I feel that if I did use "an" for the last item, I'd be obliged to use an article for each.

It may follow a noun, a verb, a conjunction, or an adverb.

I've never seen any rules on distributed indefinite articles, nor have I looked very hard for any.

(Please don't ask me what "it" is.)

- A.
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AvangiI've never seen any rules on distributed indefinite articles, nor have I looked very hard for any.
There are probably as many preferences as there are grammarians. English is very flexible in these matters, at least if we believe the liberal grammarians. You cannot please everybody anyway, so the best policy probably is to trust your ear. Someone else may have a different ear but that only proves that we're individuals!

Emotion: beerEmotion: beer
AvangiCan "a" distribute to a noun requiring "an"?
Eg, It may be followed by a noun, verb, conjunction, or adjective.
Or must I say, ". . . . by a noun, verb, conjunction, or an adjective." ?
This is neither here nor there, but I found these on the internet.

Do you want to hire a bookkeeper or accountant?
We offer either a condensed or expanded spreadsheet export format.
You must present evidence to a court, magistrate, or administrative tribunal.
Should you talk to someone about a drug, alcohol, or mental health problem?
Are you thinking of becoming a guardian or administrator?

I can't find anything to object to in the distribution of the article in any of these.

CJ
Thanks, Jim. Very helpful. Emotion: nodding

- A.
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