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Hello,


How many forms of -ing ending words do we have from their functions' point of view? Would you epress examples for each?


After that, how do we identify the function of each one in sentences? What method do you use please?

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anonymousHow many forms of -ing ending words do we have from their functions' point of view?

What? Do you mean this?—

Noun: Dancing is fun.

Adjective: Dancing girls are fun.

Complement: He entered the room dancing.

Non-finite participle clause: I like dancing with girls.

Finite present participle (continuous verb): I am dancing with a girl.

anonymoushow do we identify the function of each one in sentences? What method do you use please?

I look at the meaning of the sentence and how the '-ing' form is related to the other words in the sentence structure.

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What is the difference between Dancing is fun and Dancing is fun?

Complement: He entered the room dancing.

What do you mean by complement please? Is it an adverb?


And here:

Non-finite participle clause: I like dancing with girls.

Do you mean a forever desire (by non-finite?

Finite present participle (continuous verb): I am dancing with a girl.

And here a temporary (by finite)?

Would you please guide using a clear way?

What about gerunds then?

I mean the difference between Dancing is fun and Dance is fun?

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anonymousWhat do you mean by complement please? Is it an adverb?

Complement is a grammatical term. It describes a word or phrase that "completes" the idea in a clause or phrase.

Nick is cold. "Cold" is a subject complement. It describes the subject (Nick) and it completes the clause.

They named their baby John. John is an object complement. It describes the object (baby) and completes the idea of naming.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/grammar/british-grammar/about-words-clauses-and-sentences/comp...

anonymousAnd here a temporary (by finite)?

In grammar, verbs can be finite or non-finite. Finite verbs have tense, which tells us the reference time frame. Non-finite verbs do not have tense. The non-finite forms are infinitives and participles.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/grammar/british-grammar/about-words-clauses-and-sentences/clauses-finite-and-non-finite

anonymousWhat about gerunds then?

A gerund is a special non-finite form, the verb+ing (also called present participle), which functions as a noun in a sentence. Modern grammar texts have downplayed the term "gerund" in favor of the more general term non-finite clause.




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Sheila is a nurse.

Both the brothers became doctors.

1- If these bold words are complements, so where are the objects of the sentences? I think they are objects of the sentences and maybe also complements.

2- What is the difference between Dancing is fun and Dance is fun please?

3- I think a gerund is different from a present participle verb:

I'm going to Europe. (present participle)

She is also interested in visiting Europe. (gerund)

anonymousso where are the objects of the sentences?

The verbs in your sentences are intransitive. Intransitive verbs do not have objects.

anonymous3- I think a gerund is different from a present participle verb:

The verb+ing form is called a present participle. If we just see word that is a present participle (dancing, going, being, having, jumping), we cannot tell how it will be used in a sentence. As shown in a prior post, it can be used many different ways (adjective, noun, verb, etc.)

A present participle, if it functions as a noun in a sentence, "becomes" a gerund. The mix-up of form (participle) and function (nominal) is what this new grammar terminology avoids.

anonymous2- What is the difference between Dancing is fun and Dance is fun please?

Dance is a subject taught in schools. Dance is fun = I think dance is a fun subject..

Dancing is an activity. Dancing is fun. =The activity "dancing" is fun to do.

>> Intransitive verbs do not have objects.

I though they only don't have a direct object!

And about Dance and Dancing:

Do you believe both are nouns, even dancing which is an activity?


Thanks for your answers up to now.

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