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The subject is taught for no better reason that they have been traditionally taught at school.

Which interpretation is more likely?

1) the reason is omitted before ‘that’ and ‘that’ is used as a relative adverb.

2) that is used as a conjunction.

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teacherJapanThe subject is taught for no better reason than that they have been traditionally taught at school. that it has always been taught (in school(s )).

The subject is taught for no better reason than this reason: It has always been taught.

The reason that the subject is taught is that it has always been taught, and there is no better reason (that anyone can offer to explain it).


In traditional grammar, 'that' is called a conjunction.

'that it has always been taught' is a content clause. It gives the content of the reason, i.e., says what the reason is. It is not a relative clause.

When he was late for class, he gave the reason that came to his mind first.
(relative clause)
When he was late for class, he gave the reason that he had been in a minor traffic accident.
(content clause)

CJ

Comments  
teacherJapanThe subject is taught for no better reason that they have been traditionally taught at school.

That is ungrammatical. You need "than" with "no better". Also, "the subject" wants a singular pronoun, not "they". I would move "traditionally" because where it is it sounds like it was taught in a traditional manner, which may be true, but it is not what is meant.

The subject is taught for no better reason than that it has traditionally been taught at school.

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Thank you for the correction, anonymous. So how would you interpret “that” after than?

1) the reason is omitted before ‘that’ and ‘that’ is used as a relative adverb.

2) that is used as a conjunction.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you very much for your detailed explanation, CJ. It makes perfect sense now.
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