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Hello everyone,

I came across with this sentence while I was reading a text but I couldn't fully understand the function of "as in te sentence". Here is the sentence:

Macho society under scrutiny as despair drives young men to 'honourable death'. This is a title but you can find the whole text on The Time's website.

Does "as" mean "because" here?

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
DollHello everyone,

I came across with this sentence while I was reading a text but I couldn't fully understand the function of "as in te sentence". Here is the sentence:

Macho society under scrutiny as despair drives young men to 'honourable death'. This is a title but you can find the whole text on The Time's website.

Does "as" mean "because" here?

Thanks in advance.

Not exactly, but kind of. Here, 'as' means more like 'while' or 'as the same time/during the period which'. Maybe close to the word 'since'.

Headlines (due to space issues) are often so truncated they're difficult to read, and often aren't complete, grammatical sentences.

Perhaps if I wrote out the headline as a sentence, including some of the missing, (but presumed to be understood/inferred by the reader) content, it will make more sense.

"Macho society is now under scrutiny since despair is driving young men to commit suicide as a means of an 'honorable death'. "
Wow, thanks Skrej! I understand it now. [F]
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DollDoes "as" mean "because" here?
No. It means "at the same time as".
is was omitted in the headline. Read it as: is under scrutiny.
CJ

Indeed, difficult to tell which of the following:

----

as

5 : during or at the same time that : WHILE, WHEN <promptly opened fire again as he turned away -- C.S.Forester> <as he paced back and forth the idea occurred to him> <you will see the tower as you cross the bridge>

8 : for the reason that : BECAUSE, SINCE <remained in great loneliness and considerable privation as he had no income -- W.L.Sullivan>

http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com

-------------

This is journalese ("as" is a nice short word for headlines). Here it indicates that the two things are going on at the same time (or roughly the same time), in much the same way as "I nearly ran over a cat as I was driving to work". The This journalistic use of "as" also implies cause-and-effect without actually saying so. This can be misused (though your quote isn't a particularly bad example). It's handy for journalists as it allows them to associate two things in the reader's mind without the bother of actually demonstrating that there is any link between the two.
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Thank you Mr Wordy, Marius and CJ! I hug you all. [}]

Indeed, this drive for conciseness often causes some confusion, and leads to unintentionally funny headlines, bylines, and adverts. A couple of U.S. late night talk show programs regularly feature some of the latest examples. I know Leno does, and I believe Letterman has them from time to time.

Some examples.

http://www.witty-quotes.com/headlines_1.html
http://www.innocentenglish.com/funny-bloopers-mistakes-quotes/funny-newspaper-headlines.html
http://www.plainlanguage.gov/examples/humor/headlines.cfm
http://www.antion.com/humor/speakerhumor/headlines.htm

They really are!
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