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(1) If you see any interesting book, buy it for me.

(2) If you see any interesting book, buy one for me.

(3) If you see any interesting books, buy one for me.[correct]

(4) If you see any interesting books, buy some for me.[correct]

(5) If you see any interesting books, buy them for me.

I think (3) and (4) are without question correct. What about the rest?
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Comments  
1&2 need books to be plural. If you see any bookS.

1 could be rewritten as If you see an interesting book, buy it for me.

5 is okay - but you're telling the person to buy all the interesting books he sees.
They are all possible except 2, which needs books:

If you see any interesting books, buy one for me.

The first one, though possible, is not idiomatic. We are more likely to say:

If you see an interesting book, buy it for me.

CJ
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Isn't there a contradiction here?
an (unspecific) interesting book, buy it (specific) for me.
Hi,

Isn't there a contradiction here?
an (unspecific) interesting book, buy it (specific) for me.


It's like saying 'A man walked into the room. He sat down.' Are you OK with this example?

Best wishes, Clive
This is not directed to anyone particular but can you kindly tell me whether they are correct?

1. If you see some interesting book, buy it for me.

2. If you see some interesting book, buy one for me.

3. If you see some interesting books, buy one for me.

4. If you see some interestng books, buy some for me.

5. If you see some interesting books, buy them for me.

Thank you in advance.
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BelieverThis is not directed to anyone particular but can you kindly tell me whether they are correct?

1. If you see AN interesting book, buy it for me.

2. If you see some interesting bookS, buy one for me. (the same as #3)

3. If you see some interesting books, buy one for me.

4. If you see some interestng books, buy some for me.

5. If you see some interesting books, buy them for me.

Thank you in advance.

some requires a plural.
I think many people would say that some could mean one in informal English or it at least has some acceptance with the meaning of such.

If you across some interesting book, let me know.

Is the underlined part right grammatically?
BelieverI think many people would say that some could mean one in informal English or with the meaning of such.

If you across some interesting book, let me know.

Is the underlined part right grammatically?

The undenrlined part is not necessary. "It at least has some acceptance" is just fine. As a matter of fact, it sounds a little rough to my ears.

This is a first time I hear this reference about [some]. [Someone] is one. [Some] people can’t not be a singular reference, can’t it?

If you say to me “I need a light bulb, if you are going shopping, can you get me some?”. How many are you expecting me to buy for you? “Get me some” means more than one light bulb and so I will buy a pack of 4 for you at least, not one. And I expect you to pay me back for 4 , not oneEmotion: wink
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