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Hi

Would you say that the second sentence works fine too? Any other suggestions please?

  1. The lady asked the shopkeeper how much the damaged pan was.
  2. The lady asked the shopkeeper how much was the damaged pan.

Thanks,

Tom

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Mr. TomWould you say that the second sentence works fine too?

Yes, in informal settings. It's called a semi-indirect question (the first example being an indirect question).

CJ

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Thanks, CJ. One more question please.

What about this? Is the second sentence also a semi-indirect question and OK in informal settings?

Do you know who I am?

Do you know who am I?

Tom

Mr. Tom

Thanks, CJ. One more question please.

What about this? Is the second sentence also a semi-indirect question and OK in informal settings?

Do you know who I am?

Do you know who am I?

Tom

I consider it only borderline acceptable. Most of those equative sentences sound strange when embedded as a direct question. They are all best done with the linking verb hanging out at the end.

Do you know ...
who I am?
what that is?
where they were?*
who it was?
...

*not strictly speaking equative, but it needs the same pattern.

CJ